Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

x      QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2018

 

OR

 

o         TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from           to           

 

Commission file number 001-38596

 

REPLIMUNE GROUP, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

 

82-2082553

(State or other jurisdiction of

 

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization)

 

Identification No.)

 

18 Commerce Way

Woburn MA 01801

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

 

(781) 995-2443

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   Yes  o  No  x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.045 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).   Yes  x  No  o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer o

 

Accelerated filer o

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer x

 

Smaller reporting company o

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company x

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  o  No  x.

 

The number of shares of the registrant’s Common Stock, par value $0.001 per share, outstanding as of November 12, 2018 was 31,553,672.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

 

REPLIMUNE GROUP, INC.

 

FORM 10-Q

 

INDEX

 

 

Page No.

PART I FINANCIAL INFORMATION

1

 

 

Item 1. Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

1

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets

1

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations

2

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss

3

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

5

 

 

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

6

 

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

30

 

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

41

 

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

43

 

 

PART II OTHER INFORMATION

44

 

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

44

 

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

44

 

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

90

 

 

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities

90

 

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosure

90

 

 

Item 5. Other Information

90

 

 

Item 6. Exhibits

91

 

 

SIGNATURES

92

 


Table of Contents

 

PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1.   Financial Statements.

 

REPLIMUNE GROUP, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

(Amounts in thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

September 30,

 

March 31,

 

 

 

2018

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

23,282

 

$

17,583

 

Short-term investments

 

124,612

 

43,968

 

Research and development incentives receivable

 

2,221

 

2,389

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

1,752

 

763

 

Total current assets

 

151,867

 

64,703

 

Property, plant and equipment, net

 

420

 

370

 

Research and development incentives receivable - long term

 

343

 

 

Restricted cash

 

1,186

 

78

 

Total assets

 

$

153,816

 

$

65,151

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities, Convertible Preferred Stock and Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

2,072

 

$

1,993

 

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

 

1,672

 

3,171

 

Total current liabilities

 

3,744

 

5,164

 

Deferred rent, net of current portion

 

36

 

52

 

Warrant liability

 

 

1,642

 

Total liabilities

 

3,780

 

6,858

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 13)

 

 

 

 

 

Convertible preferred stock (Series Seed, A and B), $0.001 par value; 0 and 1,975,968 shares authorized as of September 30, 2018 and March 31, 2018, respectively; 0 and 1,925,968 shares issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2018 and March 31, 2018, respectively

 

 

86,361

 

Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit):

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value; 150,000,000 and 27,314,288 shares authorized (inclusive of 0 and 26,258 shares of common A stock) as of September 30, 2018 and March 31, 2018 , respectively; 31,553,672 and 5,007,485 shares issued and outstanding (inclusive of 0 and 26,258 shares of common A stock) as of September 30, 2018 and March 31, 2018 , respectively

 

32

 

5

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

196,664

 

1,097

 

Accumulated deficit

 

(45,437

)

(28,932

)

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

(1,223

)

(238

)

Total stockholders’ equity (deficit)

 

150,036

 

(28,068

)

Total liabilities, convertible preferred stock and stockholders’ equity (deficit)

 

$

153,816

 

$

65,151

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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Table of Contents

 

REPLIMUNE GROUP, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

(Amounts in thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

2018

 

2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

$

4,962

 

$

3,149

 

$

8,898

 

$

5,440

 

General and administrative

 

2,142

 

1,107

 

4,085

 

1,992

 

Total operating expenses

 

7,104

 

4,256

 

12,983

 

7,432

 

Loss from operations

 

(7,104

)

(4,256

)

(12,983

)

(7,432

)

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development incentives

 

(77

)

636

 

361

 

1,103

 

Interest income

 

664

 

10

 

891

 

40

 

Change in fair value of warrant liability

 

(2

)

(578

)

(5,452

)

(578

)

Other income (expense), net

 

58

 

(472

)

678

 

(1,345

)

Total other income (expense), net

 

643

 

(404

)

(3,522

)

(780

)

Net loss

 

$

(6,461

)

$

(4,660

)

$

(16,505

)

$

(8,212

)

Net loss attributable to common stockholders

 

$

(6,461

)

$

(4,660

)

$

(16,505

)

$

(8,212

)

Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted

 

$

(0.26

)

$

(0.94

)

$

(1.11

)

$

(1.65

)

Weighted average common shares outstanding, basic and diluted

 

24,574,239

 

4,978,264

 

14,831,266

 

4,975,865

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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REPLIMUNE GROUP, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

 

(Amounts in thousands)

 

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

2018

 

2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(6,461

)

$

(4,660

)

$

(16,505

)

$

(8,212

)

Other comprehensive income (loss):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign currency translation gain (loss)

 

(139

)

624

 

(986

)

1,577

 

Net unrealized gain (loss) on short-term investments, net of tax

 

(34

)

 

1

 

 

Comprehensive loss

 

$

(6,634

)

$

(4,036

)

$

(17,490

)

$

(6,635

)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

3


 

Table of Contents

 

REPLIMUNE GROUP, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CONVERTIBLE PREFERRED STOCK AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

(Amounts in thousands, except share amounts)

 

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

 

 

 

Convertible

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional

 

 

 

other

 

Total

 

 

 

preferred stock

 

 

Common stock

 

paid-in

 

Accumulated

 

comprehensive

 

stockholders’

 

 

 

Shares

 

Amount

 

 

Shares

 

Amount

 

capital

 

deficit

 

loss

 

equity (deficit)

 

Balances as of March 31, 2018

 

1,925,968

 

$

86,361

 

 

5,007,485

 

$

5

 

$

1,097

 

$

(28,932

)

$

(238

)

$

(28,068

)

Conversion of convertible preferred stock into common stock upon closing of initial public offering

 

(1,925,968

)

(86,361

)

 

19,157,360

 

19

 

86,342

 

 

 

86,361

 

Conversion of convertible preferred stock warrants into common stock warrants

 

 

 

 

 

 

7,094

 

 

 

7,094

 

Repurchase of class A common stock upon closing of initial public offering

 

 

 

 

(26,258

)

 

 

 

 

 

Issuance of common stock upon closing of initial public offering, net of issuance costs and underwriter fees of $9,935

 

 

 

 

7,407,936

 

7

 

101,177

 

 

 

101,184

 

Stock-based compensation expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

943

 

 

 

943

 

Exercise of stock options

 

 

 

 

7,149

 

1

 

11

 

 

 

12

 

Unrealized gain on short-term investments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

1

 

Foreign currency translation adjustment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(986

)

(986

)

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(16,505

)

 

(16,505

)

Balances as of September 30, 2018

 

 

$

 

 

31,553,672

 

$

32

 

$

196,664

 

$

(45,437

)

$

(1,223

)

$

150,036

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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REPLIMUNE GROUP, INC.

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

(Amounts in thousands)

 

(Unaudited)

 

 

 

Six Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(16,505

)

$

(8,212

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Stock-based compensation expense

 

943

 

201

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

69

 

50

 

Change in fair value of warrant liability

 

5,452

 

578

 

Net amortization/accretion of premiums and discounts on short-term investments

 

(544

)

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development incentives receivable

 

(344

)

(1,113

)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

(1,034

)

(1,027

)

Accounts payable

 

150

 

577

 

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

 

(1,417

)

(128

)

Deferred rent

 

(12

)

(12

)

Net cash used in operating activities

 

(13,242

)

(9,086

)

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of property, plant and equipment

 

(119

)

(134

)

Purchase of short-term investments

 

(110,850

)

 

Sales and maturities of short-term investments

 

30,750

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

(80,219

)

(134

)

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of series B convertible preferred stock, net of issuance costs

 

 

54,752

 

Proceeds from issuance of common stock in initial public offering, net of underwriting fees and discounts

 

103,341

 

 

Exercise of stock options

 

12

 

 

Payment of issuance costs

 

(2,157

)

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

101,196

 

54,752

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

 

(928

)

1,492

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash

 

6,807

 

47,024

 

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of period

 

17,661

 

20,669

 

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of period

 

$

24,468

 

$

67,693

 

Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Conversion of convertible preferred stock warrants into common stock warrants

 

$

86,361

 

$

 

Conversion of convertible preferred stock into common stock

 

$

7,094

 

$

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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REPLIMUNE GROUP, INC.

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

(Amounts in thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 

(Unaudited)

 

1.              Nature of the business

 

Replimune Group, Inc. (the “Company”) is a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on the development of oncolytic immunotherapies to treat cancer.

 

Replimune Limited (“Replimune UK”) was incorporated in 2015 under the laws of England, and was the sole shareholder of Replimune, Inc. (“Replimune US”), a Delaware corporation. On July 5, 2017, Replimune Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation, was incorporated and on July 10, 2017 the shareholders of Replimune UK effected a share-for-share exchange pursuant to which they exchanged their outstanding shares in Replimune UK for shares in Replimune Group, Inc., on a one-for-one basis. In addition, the holders of warrants and stock options to purchase Replimune UK capital stock canceled their warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock and stock options in Replimune UK and were issued replacement warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock and stock options to acquire Replimune Group, Inc. capital stock on a one-for-one basis. These transactions are collectively referred to as the reorganization. Upon completion of the reorganization, the historical consolidated financial statements of Replimune UK became the historical consolidated financial statements of Replimune Group, Inc. because the reorganization was accounted for similar to a reorganization of entities under common control due to the high degree of common ownership of Replimune UK and Replimune Group, Inc. and lack of economic substance to the transaction. The Company concluded that the reorganization resulted in no change in the material rights and preferences of each respective class of equity interests and no change in the fair value of each respective class of equity interests before and after the reorganization. On December 8, 2017, Replimune UK transferred all outstanding shares of its wholly owned subsidiary, Replimune US to Replimune Group, Inc. Replimune Group. Inc., a Delaware corporation, is the sole shareholder of Replimune UK, Replimune US and Replimune Securities Corporation, a Massachusetts corporation that was incorporated in November 2017.

 

The Company is subject to risks and uncertainties common to early-stage companies in the biotechnology industry, including, but not limited to, development by competitors of new technological innovations, dependence on key personnel, protection of proprietary technology, compliance with government regulations and the ability to secure additional capital to fund operations. Product candidates currently under development will require significant additional research and development efforts, including preclinical and clinical testing and regulatory approval, prior to commercialization. These efforts require significant amounts of additional capital, adequate personnel and infrastructure and extensive compliance and reporting capabilities. Even if the Company’s product development efforts are successful, it is uncertain when, if ever, the Company will realize significant revenue from product sales.

 

Forward stock split

 

On July 9, 2018, the Company effected a 1-for-9.94688 forward stock split of its issued and outstanding shares of common stock and a proportional adjustment to the existing conversion ratios for each series of the Company’s Preferred Stock (see Note 7). Accordingly, all share and per share amounts for all periods presented in the accompanying consolidated financial statements and notes thereto have been adjusted retroactively, where applicable, to reflect this forward stock split and adjustment of the preferred stock conversion ratios. Further, on July 9, 2018, the Company’s authorized shares of common stock were increased to 27,314,288. Accordingly, the authorized shares of common stock presented in the accompanying consolidated financial statements and notes thereto have been adjusted retroactively, where applicable, to reflect the newly authorized shares of common stock.

 

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Initial public offering

 

On July 24, 2018, the Company completed an initial public offering (“IPO”) of its common stock and issued and sold 6,700,000 shares of common stock at a public offering price of $15.00 per share, resulting in net proceeds of $93,465 after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions but before deducting offering costs of $2,157.

 

Upon closing of the IPO, the Company’s outstanding convertible preferred stock automatically converted into shares of common stock (see Note 7). Upon conversion of the convertible preferred stock, the Company reclassified the carrying value of the convertible preferred stock to common stock and additional paid-in capital.  The warrant to purchase shares of the Company’s series seed convertible preferred stock was converted into a warrant to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock upon the closing of the IPO. As a result, the warrant liability was remeasured a final time on the closing date of the IPO and reclassified to stockholders’ equity (deficit).  Additionally, the Company repurchased 26,258 shares of class A common stock at a price equal to its par value upon the closing of the IPO.

 

On July 30, 2018, the Company issued and sold an additional 707,936 shares of its common stock at the IPO price of $15.00 per share pursuant to the underwriters’ partial exercise of their option to purchase additional shares of common stock, resulting in additional net proceeds of $9,876 after deducting discounts and commissions and other offering expenses.

 

Also, in connection with the completion of its IPO on July 24, 2018, the Company filed an amended and restated certificate of incorporation with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware to authorize the issuance of up to 150,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.001 per share, and 10,000,000 shares of undesignated preferred stock, par value $0.001 per share.

 

Basis of presentation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the basis of continuity of operations, realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities and commitments in the ordinary course of business. The Company has incurred recurring losses since its inception, including net losses of $6,461 and $4,660 for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively and net losses of $16,505 and $8,212 for the six months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively. In addition, as of September 30, 2018, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $45,437. The Company expects to continue to generate operating losses for the foreseeable future. As of November 13, 2018, the issuance date of these consolidated financial statements, the Company expects that its cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments will be sufficient to fund its operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements through at least 12 months from the issuance of the consolidated financial statements. The future viability of the Company beyond that point is dependent on its ability to raise additional capital to finance its operations.

 

If the Company is unable to obtain funding it could be forced to delay, reduce or eliminate some or all of its research and development programs, product portfolio expansion or commercialization efforts, which could adversely affect its business prospects, or it may be unable to continue operations. Although management continues to pursue these plans, there is no assurance that the Company will be successful in obtaining sufficient funding on terms acceptable to the Company to fund continuing operations, if at all.

 

2.              Summary of significant accounting policies

 

Principles of consolidation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries, Replimune UK, Replimune US and Replimune Securities Corporation, after elimination of all intercompany accounts and transactions. The consolidated financial statements reflect the capital as if Replimune Group, Inc. had been in existence for all periods presented.

 

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Use of estimates

 

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting periods. Significant estimates and assumptions reflected in these consolidated financial statements include, but are not limited to, the accrual for research and development expenses and the valuation of common stock and stock-based awards. The Company bases its estimates on historical experience, known trends and other market-specific or other relevant factors that it believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Estimates are periodically reviewed in light of reasonable changes in circumstances, facts and experience. Changes in estimates are recorded in the period in which they become known. Actual results could differ from those estimates or assumptions.

 

Unaudited interim financial information

 

The accompanying consolidated balance sheet as of September 30, 2018, the consolidated statements of operations, of comprehensive loss and of cash flows for the three and six months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 and the consolidated statement of convertible preferred stock and stockholders’ deficit as of September 30, 2018 are unaudited. The unaudited interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as the audited annual consolidated financial statements and, in the opinion of management, reflect all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary for the fair presentation of the Company’s financial position as of September 30, 2018 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the three and six months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017. The financial data and other information disclosed in these consolidated notes related to the three and six months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 are unaudited. The results for the three and six months ended September 30, 2018 are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for the year ending March 31, 2019, any other interim periods or any future year or period.

 

Foreign currency and currency translation

 

The functional currency for the Company’s wholly owned foreign subsidiary, Replimune UK, is the British pound. Assets and liabilities of Replimune UK are translated into United States dollars at the exchange rate in effect on the balance sheet date. Revenues and expenses are translated at the average exchange rate in effect during the period. Unrealized translation gains and losses are recorded as a cumulative translation adjustment, which is included in the consolidated statements of convertible preferred stock and stockholders’ equity (deficit) as a component of accumulated other comprehensive loss. Adjustments that arise from exchange rate changes on transactions denominated in a currency other than the local currency are included in other income (expense), net in the consolidated statements of operations as incurred.

 

Concentrations of credit risk and of significant suppliers

 

Financial instruments that potentially expose the Company to concentrations of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents as well as short-term investments. The Company deposits its cash in financial institutions in amounts that may exceed federally insured limits, and has not experienced any losses on such accounts and does not believe it is exposed to any unusual credit risk beyond the normal credit risk associated with commercial banking relationships.

 

The Company relies, and expects to continue to rely, on a small number of vendors to manufacture supplies and raw materials for its development programs. These programs could be adversely affected by a significant interruption in these manufacturing services or the availability of raw materials.

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less at date of purchase to be cash equivalents. Cash equivalents consisted of commercial paper at

 

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September 30, 2018 and money market funds at March 31, 2018. As of September 30, 2018, and March 31, 2018, cash equivalents totaled $17,589 and $4,130, respectively.

 

Restricted Cash

 

The Company maintains certain minimum balances in segregated bank accounts in connection with its corporate credit cards and a letter of credit for the benefit of the landlords in connection with an operating lease. As of September 30, 2018 and March 31, 2018, restricted cash consisted of $0 and $78, respectively, held in connection with the Company’s corporate credit cards and $1,186 and $0, respectively, held for the benefit of the landlords in connection with an operating lease. These amounts have been classified as non-current assets on the Company’s consolidated balance sheets.

 

Short-term investments

 

The Company’s short-term debt security investments are classified as available-for-sale and are carried at fair value, with the unrealized gains and losses reported as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in stockholders’ equity (deficit). Realized gains and losses and declines in value determined to be other than temporary are based on the specific identification method and are included as a component of other income (expense), net in the consolidated statements of operations.

 

The Company evaluates its short-term debt security investments with unrealized losses for other-than-temporary impairment. When assessing short-term debt security investments for other-than-temporary declines in value, the Company considers such factors as, among other things, how significant the decline in value is as a percentage of the original cost, how long the market value of the investment has been less than its original cost, the Company’s ability and intent to retain the short-term debt security investment for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in fair value and market conditions in general. If any adjustment to fair value reflects a decline in the value of the short-term debt security investment that the Company considers to be “other than temporary,” the Company reduces the short-term debt security investment to fair value through a charge to the consolidated statements of operations. No such adjustments were necessary during the periods presented.

 

The Company’s short-term debt security investments as of September 30, 2018 and March 31, 2018 had original maturities of less than one year.

 

Deferred offering costs

 

The Company capitalizes certain legal, professional accounting and other third-party fees that are directly associated with in-process equity financings as deferred offering costs until such financings are consummated. After consummation of the equity financing, these costs are recorded in stockholders’ equity (deficit) as a reduction of proceeds generated as a result of the offering. Should an in-process equity financing be abandoned, the deferred offering costs will be expensed immediately as a charge to operating expenses in the consolidated statements of operations. The Company did not record any deferred offering costs as of March 31, 2018.  As of September 30, 2018, the Company recorded $2,157 of deferred offering costs in stockholders’ equity (deficit) as a reduction of proceeds generated as a result of the initial public offering.

 

Property, plant and equipment

 

Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Depreciation and amortization expense is recognized using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the respective assets as follows:

 

 

 

Estimated Useful life

Office equipment

 

5 years

Computer equipment

 

3 years

Plant and laboratory equipment

 

5 years

Leasehold improvements

 

Lesser of lease term or 10 years

 

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Costs for capital assets not yet placed into service are capitalized as construction-in-progress and depreciated in accordance with the above guidelines once placed into service. Upon retirement or sale, the cost of assets disposed of and the related accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and any resulting gain or loss is included in loss from operations. Expenditures for repairs and maintenance are charged to expense as incurred.

 

Impairment of long-lived assets

 

Long-lived assets consist of property, plant and equipment. Long-lived assets to be held and used are tested for recoverability whenever events or changes in business circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be fully recoverable. Factors that the Company considers in deciding when to perform an impairment review include significant underperformance of the business in relation to expectations, significant negative industry or economic trends and significant changes or planned changes in the use of the assets. If an impairment review is performed to evaluate a long-lived asset group for recoverability, the Company compares forecasts of undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the long-lived asset group to its carrying value. An impairment loss would be recognized when estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to result from the use of an asset group are less than its carrying amount. The impairment loss would be based on the excess of the carrying value of the impaired asset group over its fair value, determined based on discounted cash flows. To date, the Company has not recorded any impairment losses on long-lived assets.

 

Deferred rent

 

The Company recognizes rent expense on a straight-line basis over the respective lease terms and has recorded deferred rent for rent expense incurred but not yet paid.

 

Fair value measurements

 

Certain assets and liabilities of the Company are carried at fair value under GAAP. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. Valuation techniques used to measure fair value must maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. Financial assets and liabilities carried at fair value are to be classified and disclosed in one of the following three levels of the fair value hierarchy, of which the first two are considered observable and the last is considered unobservable:

 

·                  Level 1—Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

·                  Level 2—Observable inputs (other than Level 1 quoted prices), such as quoted prices in active markets for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active for identical or similar assets or liabilities, or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data.

 

·                  Level 3—Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity that are significant to determining the fair value of the assets or liabilities, including pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies and similar techniques.

 

The Company’s short-term investments, cash equivalents and warrant liability are carried at fair value, determined according to the fair value hierarchy described above (see Note 3). The carrying values of research and development incentives receivable, other current assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses and other current liabilities approximate their fair values due to the short-term nature of these assets and liabilities.

 

Warrant liability

 

The Company classifies warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock (see Note 8) as a liability on its consolidated balance sheets as these warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock are free-standing financial instruments that may require the Company to transfer assets upon exercise. The warrant liability was initially recorded at fair value upon the date of the warrants’ issuance and is subsequently remeasured to fair value at each reporting date. Changes in the fair value of the warrant liability are recognized as a component of other income

 

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(expense), net in the consolidated statements of operations. Changes in the fair value of the warrant liability will continue to be recognized until the warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock are exercised, expire or qualify for equity classification.

 

The Company utilizes the Black-Scholes option-pricing model, which incorporates assumptions and estimates, to value the warrant liability. The Company assesses these assumptions and estimates on a quarterly basis as additional information impacting assumptions is obtained. Estimates and assumptions impacting the fair value measurement include the expected stock price volatility, the expected term of the warrant, the risk-free interest rate for a period that approximates the expected term of the warrant, and the Company’s expected dividend yield (see Note 3).

 

Upon the closing of the IPO, the warrant to purchase shares of the Company’s series seed convertible preferred stock was converted into a warrant to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock.  As a result, the warrant liability was remeasured a final time on the closing date of the IPO and reclassified to stockholders’ equity (deficit).

 

Segment information

 

The Company manages its operations as a single operating segment for the purposes of assessing performance and making operating decisions. The Company’s current focus is on developing oncolytic immunotherapies for the treatment of cancer.

 

Research and development costs

 

Research and development costs are expensed as incurred. Research and development expenses consist of costs incurred in performing research and development activities, including salaries, stock-based compensation and benefits, facilities costs and laboratory supplies, depreciation and external costs of outside vendors engaged to conduct preclinical development, clinical development activities and clinical trials as well as to manufacture clinical trial materials. Non-refundable prepayments for goods or services that will be used or rendered for future research and development activities are deferred and capitalized. Such amounts are recognized as an expense as the goods are delivered or the related services are performed, or until it is no longer expected that the goods will be delivered or the services rendered.

 

Research contract costs and accruals

 

The Company has entered into various research and development-related contracts with companies both inside and outside of the United States. These agreements are generally cancelable, and related costs are recorded as research and development expenses as incurred. The Company records accruals for estimated ongoing research costs. When evaluating the adequacy of the accrued liabilities, the Company analyzes progress of the studies or clinical trials, including the phase or completion of events, invoices received and contracted costs. Significant judgments and estimates are made in determining the accrued balances at the end of any reporting period. Actual results could differ from the Company’s estimates. The Company’s historical accrual estimates have not been materially different from the actual costs.

 

Patent costs

 

All patent-related costs incurred in connection with filing and prosecuting patent applications are expensed as incurred due to the uncertainty about the recovery of the expenditure. Amounts incurred are classified as general and administrative expenses.

 

Stock-based compensation

 

The Company measures all stock-based awards granted to employees and directors based on the fair value on the date of the grant and recognizes compensation expense for those awards over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period of the respective award. The fair value of each stock option grant is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model, which requires inputs based on certain subjective assumptions, including the expected stock price volatility, the expected term of the option, the risk-free interest rate

 

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for a period that approximates the expected term of the option, and the Company’s expected dividend yield (see Note 10). Forfeitures are accounted for as they occur. To date, the Company has issued stock-based awards with only service-based vesting conditions and records the expense for these awards using the straight-line method.

 

For stock-based awards granted to consultants and non-employees, compensation expense is recognized over the shorter of the vesting period or the period during which services are rendered by such consultants and non-employees until completed. At the end of each financial reporting period prior to completion of the service, the fair value of these awards is remeasured using the then-current fair value of the Company’s common stock and updated assumption inputs in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model.

 

The Company classifies stock-based compensation expense in its consolidated statements of operations in the same manner in which the award recipient’s payroll costs are classified or in which the award recipient’s service payments are classified.

 

Research and development incentives and receivable

 

The Company, through its subsidiary in the United Kingdom, receives reimbursements of certain research and development expenditures as part of a United Kingdom government’s research and development tax reliefs program. Under the program, a percentage of qualifying research and development expenses incurred by the Company’s subsidiary in the United Kingdom are reimbursed up to 14.5%.

 

Management has assessed the Company’s research and development activities and expenditures to determine which activities and expenditures are likely to be eligible under the research and development incentive program described above. At each period end, management estimates the reimbursement available to the Company based on available information at the time.

 

The Company recognizes income from the research and development incentives when the relevant expenditure has been incurred, the associated conditions have been satisfied and there is reasonable assurance that the reimbursement will be received. The Company records these research and development incentives as other income. The research and development incentives receivable represents an amount due in connection with the above program. The Company recorded other income (expense) from research and development incentives of $(77) and $361 during the three and six months ended September 30, 2018, respectively. The Company recorded other income from research and development incentives of $636 and $1,103 during the three and six months ended September 30, 2017, respectively, in the consolidated statements of operations and a research and development incentives receivable of $2,564 (of which $2,221 was classified as current and $343 was classified as long-term) and $2,389 as of September 30, 2018 and March 31, 2018, respectively, on the consolidated balance sheets.

 

Comprehensive loss

 

Comprehensive loss includes net loss as well as other changes in stockholders’ equity (deficit) that result from transactions and economic events other than those with stockholders. For the three and six months ended September 30, 2018, comprehensive loss included $139 and $986 of foreign currency translation adjustments, respectively and $(34) and $1 of unrealized gains (losses) on short-term investments, net of tax, respectively. For the three and six months ended September 30, 2017, comprehensive gain (loss) included $624 and $1,577 of foreign currency translation adjustments, respectively.

 

Income taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method, which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in the consolidated financial statements or in the Company’s tax returns. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined on the basis of the differences between the consolidated financial statements and tax basis of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. Changes in deferred tax assets and liabilities are recorded in the provision for income taxes. The Company assesses the likelihood that its deferred tax assets will be recovered from future taxable income and, to the extent it believes, based upon the weight of available evidence, that it is more likely than not that all or a portion of the deferred tax assets will not be

 

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realized, a valuation allowance is established through a charge to income tax expense. Potential for recovery of deferred tax assets is evaluated by estimating the future taxable profits expected and considering prudent and feasible tax planning strategies.

 

The Company accounts for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in the consolidated financial statements by applying a two-step process to determine the amount of tax benefit to be recognized. First, the tax position must be evaluated to determine the likelihood that it will be sustained upon external examination by the taxing authorities. If the tax position is deemed more-likely-than-not to be sustained, the tax position is then assessed to determine the amount of benefit to recognize in the consolidated financial statements. The amount of the benefit that may be recognized is the largest amount that has a greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. The provision for income taxes includes the effects of any resulting tax reserves, or unrecognized tax benefits, that are considered appropriate as well as the related net interest and penalties.

 

Net income (loss) per share

 

The Company follows the two-class method when computing net income (loss) per share as the Company has issued shares that meet the definition of participating securities. The two-class method determines net income (loss) per share for each class of common and participating securities according to dividends declared or accumulated and participation rights in undistributed earnings. The two-class method requires income available to common stockholders for the period to be allocated between common and participating securities based upon their respective rights to receive dividends as if all income for the period had been distributed.

 

Basic net income (loss) per share attributable to common stockholders is computed by dividing the net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding for the period. Diluted net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders is computed by adjusting net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders to reallocate undistributed earnings based on the potential impact of dilutive securities. Diluted net income (loss) per share attributable to common stockholders is computed by dividing the diluted net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding for the period, including potential dilutive common shares assuming the dilutive effect of common stock equivalents.

 

Common A shares are excluded when computing net income (loss) per share as they have nominal economic rights.

 

The Company’s convertible preferred stock contractually entitles the holders of such shares to participate in dividends but contractually do not require the holders of such shares to participate in losses of the Company. Accordingly, in periods in which the Company reports a net loss, such losses are not allocated to such participating securities. In periods in which the Company reports a net loss attributable to common stockholders, diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders is the same as basic net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, since dilutive common shares are not assumed to have been issued if their effect is anti-dilutive.

 

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-09, Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Scope of Modification Accounting (“ASU 2017-09”), which clarifies when to account for a change to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award as a modification. Under the new guidance, modification accounting is required only if the fair value, the vesting conditions, or the classification of the award (as equity or liability) changes as a result of the change in terms or conditions. The standard is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. The Company adopted ASU 2017-09 as of the required effective date of April 1, 2018 and will apply to any changes to the terms or conditions of share-based payment awards prospectively.

 

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash  (“ASU 2016-18”), which requires restricted cash to be presented with cash and cash equivalents on the consolidated statements of cash flows and disclosure of how the consolidated statements of cash flows reconciles to the balance sheet if restricted cash is shown separately from cash and cash equivalents on the balance sheet. The standard is

 

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effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. The Company adopted ASU 2016-18 as of April 1, 2018.  Restricted cash is now included as a component of cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash on the Company’s consolidated statement of cash flows. Upon the adoption of ASU 2016-18, the amount of cash and cash equivalents previously presented on the consolidated statements of cash flows will reflect the inclusion of restricted cash in the amount reported for changes in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash. Additionally, as a result of the adoption, transfers between restricted and unrestricted cash are no longer presented as a component of the Company’s investing activities.

 

In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-16, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Intra-Entity Transfer of Assets Other than Inventory  (“ASU 2016-16”), which requires the recognition of the income tax consequences of an intra-entity transfer of an asset, other than inventory, when the transfer occurs. The standard is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company adopted ASU 2016-16 as of the required effective date of April 1, 2018. The adoption of ASU 2016-16 did not have a material impact on the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows: Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments  (“ASU 2016-15”), to address diversity in practice in how certain cash receipts and cash payments are presented and classified in the consolidated statements of cash flows. The standard is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company adopted ASU 2016-16 as of the required effective date of April 1, 2018. The adoption of ASU 2016-15 did not have a material impact on the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) (“ASU 2014-09”), which supersedes existing revenue recognition guidance under GAAP. The standard’s core principle is that a company will recognize revenue when it transfers promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The standard defines a five-step process to achieve this principle, and will require companies to use more judgment and make more estimates than under the current guidance. The Company expects that these judgments and estimates will include identifying performance obligations in the customer contract, estimating the amount of variable consideration to include in the transaction price and allocating the transaction price to each separate performance obligation. ASU 2014-09 also requires additional disclosure about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer contracts. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers  (Topic 606): Deferral of the Effective Date, which delays the effective date of ASU 2014-09 such that the standard is effective for public entities for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017 and for interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption of the standard is permitted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016. The Company adopted ASU 2014-09 on a full retrospective basis effective April 1, 2018.  The adoption of ASU 2014-09 did not have an impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements as the Company does not currently have any revenue-generating arrangements.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820), Disclosure Framework - Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement (“ASU 2018-13”). The amendments in this ASU require certain existing disclosure requirements in Topic 820 to be modified or removed, and certain new disclosure requirements to be added to the Topic. In addition, this ASU allows entities to exercise more discretion when considering fair value measurement disclosures. ASU 2018-13 will be effective for the Company beginning January 1, 2020 with early adoption permitted. The Company is in the process of evaluating the impact of ASU 2018-13 on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-11, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260), Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (Topic 480), Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815) I. Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Down Round Features II. Replacement of the Indefinite Deferral for Mandatorily Redeemable Financial Instruments of Certain Nonpublic Entities and Certain Mandatorily Redeemable Noncontrolling Interests with a Scope Exception (“ASU 2017-11”). Part I applies to entities that issue financial instruments such as warrants,

 

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convertible debt or convertible preferred stock that contain down-round features. Part II replaces the indefinite deferral for certain mandatorily redeemable noncontrolling interests and mandatorily redeemable financial instruments of nonpublic entities contained within Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 480 with a scope exception and does not impact the accounting for these mandatorily redeemable instruments. ASU 2017-11 is required to be adopted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The adoption of ASU 2017-11 is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), which supersedes FASB Topic 840, Leases (Topic 840) and provides principles for the recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of leases for both lessees and lessors. The new standard requires lessees to apply a dual approach, classifying leases as either finance or operating leases based on the principle of whether or not the lease is effectively a financed purchase by the lessee. This classification will determine whether lease expense is recognized based on an effective interest method or on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease, respectively. A lessee is also required to record a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for all leases with a term of greater than 12 months regardless of classification. Leases with a term of 12 months or less will be accounted for similar to existing guidance for operating leases. In January 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-01, Leases (Topic 842) Land Easement Practical Expedient for Transition to Topic 842, which amends ASU 2016-02 to provide entities an optional transition practical expedient to not evaluate under Topic 842 existing or expired land easements that were not previously accounted for as leases under the current leases guidance in Topic 842. An entity that elects this practical expedient should evaluate new or modified land easements under Topic 842 beginning at the date that the entity adopts Topic 842. In July 2018, the FASB also issued ASU 2018-11, Leases (Topic 842): Targeted Improvements, which provides an optional transition method that allows entities to elect to apply the standard prospectively at its effective date, versus recasting the prior periods presented. The standard will be effective for annual and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2018, with early adoption permitted upon issuance. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of pending adoption on its condensed consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued (“ASU 2018-07”), Compensation — Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting. ASU 2018-17 expands the scope of Topic 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees. ASU 2018-17 also clarifies that Topic 718 does not apply to share-based payments used to effectively provide (1) financing to the issuer or (2) awards granted in conjunction with selling goods or services to customers as part of a contract accounted for under Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606). The guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within that fiscal year. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently assessing the effect that ASU 2018-17 will have on our financial position, results of operations, and disclosures.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-09 Codification Improvements (“ASU 2018-09”), which does not prescribe any new accounting guidance, but instead makes minor improvements and clarifications of several different FASB Accounting Standards Codification areas based on comments and suggestions made by various stakeholders. The majority of the amendments in ASU 2018-09 will be effective for the Company in annual periods

 

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beginning after December 15, 2018.  The Company is currently evaluating the impact this change will have on its consolidated financial statements and disclosures.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework — Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement (“ASU 2018-13”), which is part of the disclosure framework project and eliminates certain disclosure requirements for fair value measurements, requires entities to disclose new information, and modifies existing disclosure requirements. The new guidance is effective after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact this change will have on its consolidated financial statements and disclosures.

 

3.              Fair value of financial assets and liabilities

 

The following tables present information about the Company’s financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis:

 

 

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

 

 

as of September 30, 2018 Using:

 

 

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Level 3

 

Total

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

 

$

12,595

 

$

 

$

12,595

 

Commercial paper

 

 

95,051

 

 

95,051

 

Corporate debt securities

 

 

34,554

 

 

34,554

 

 

 

$

 

$

142,200

 

$

 

$

142,200

 

 

 

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

 

 

as of March 31, 2018 Using:

 

 

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Level 3

 

Total

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

 

$

4,130

 

$

 

$

4,130

 

Commercial paper

 

 

27,998

 

 

27,998

 

Corporate debt securities

 

 

15,970

 

 

15,970

 

 

 

$

 

$

48,098

 

$

 

$

48,098

 

Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warrant liability

 

$

 

$

 

$

1,642

 

$

1,642

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

$

1,642

 

$

1,642

 

 

During the three and six months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, there were no transfers between levels.

 

Valuation of cash equivalents and short-term investments

 

Money market funds, commercial paper and corporate debt securities were valued by the Company using quoted prices in active markets for similar securities, which represent a Level 2 measurement within the fair value hierarchy.

 

Valuation of Warrant Liability

 

The warrant liability is related to the warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock (see Note 8). The fair value of the warrant liability was determined based on significant inputs not observable in the market, which represents a Level 3 measurement within the fair value hierarchy. Upon the closing of the IPO in July 2018, the warrant to purchase shares of the Company’s series seed convertible preferred stock was converted into a warrant to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock.  As a result, the warrant liability was remeasured a final time on the closing date of the IPO and reclassified to stockholders’ equity (deficit).

 

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The Company used the Black-Scholes option-pricing model, which incorporated assumptions and estimates, to value the warrant liability. Key estimates and assumptions impacting the fair value measurement include (i) the expected term of the warrants, (ii) the risk-free interest rate, (iii) the expected dividend yield, (iv) expected volatility of the price of the underlying series seed preferred stock and (v) the fair value of the series seed preferred stock on the valuation date. The Company estimated the fair value per share of the underlying series seed preferred stock based, in part, on the results of third-party valuations and additional factors deemed relevant. The risk-free interest rate was determined by reference to the U.S. Treasury yield curve for time periods approximately equal to the remaining contractual term of the warrants. The Company estimated a 0% expected dividend yield based on the fact that the Company has never paid or declared dividends and does not intend to do so in the foreseeable future. Prior to July 2018, the Company was a private company and accordingly, lacked company-specific historical and implied volatility information of its stock, the expected stock volatility was based on the historical volatility of publicly traded peer companies for a term equal to the remaining expected term of the warrants.

 

As of March 31, 2018, the warrant liability was valued at $1,642 and classified as a non-current liability on the consolidated balance sheet. The following assumptions were used in valuing the warrant liability:

 

 

 

March 31,
2018

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

2.69

%

Expected dividend yield

 

0

%

Expected term (in years)

 

7.5

 

Expected volatility

 

65.8

%

 

Based on the terms and conditions of the warrant, upon closing of the Company’s IPO in July 2018, the warrant to purchase shares of the Company’s series seed convertible preferred stock was converted into a warrant to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock. On that date, the Company remeasured the warrant liability to fair value and reclassified the total carrying value to additional paid-in capital. The Company performed the final remeasurement of the warrant liability using the IPO price of $15.00 per share and recorded the change in fair value as a component of other income (expense), net in the consolidated statement of operations.

 

The following assumptions were used to measure the fair market value of the warrant liability upon the conversion date:

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

2.81

%

Expected dividend yield

 

0

%

Expected term (in years)

 

7.2

 

Expected volatility

 

64.4

%

 

The following table presents a roll forward of the warrant liability:

 

 

 

Warrant
Liability

 

Balance at March 31, 2018

 

$

1,642

 

Change in fair value

 

5,452

 

Conversion of convertible preferred stock warrant into common stock warrant

 

(7,094

)

Balance at September 30, 2018

 

$

 

 

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4.              Short-term investments

 

Short-term investments by investment type consisted of the following:

 

 

 

September 30, 2018

 

 

 

Amortized
cost

 

Gross
Unrealized
Gains

 

Gross
Unrealized
Losses

 

Fair value

 

Commercial paper

 

$

90,104

 

$

 

$

(46

)

$

90,058

 

Corporate debt securities

 

34,572

 

1

 

(19

)

34,554

 

 

 

$

124,676

 

$

1

 

$

(65

)

$

124,612

 

 

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

 

Amortized
cost

 

Gross
Unrealized
Gains

 

Gross
Unrealized
Losses

 

Fair value

 

Commercial paper

 

$

28,028

 

$

2

 

$

(32

)

$

27,998

 

Corporate debt securities

 

16,005

 

 

 

(35

)

15,970

 

 

 

$

44,033

 

$

2

 

$

(67

)

$

43,968

 

 

As of September 30, 2018 and March 31, 2018, $4,993 and $0 of the Company’s investments in commercial paper were classified within cash equivalents on the consolidated balance sheet.

 

5.              Property, plant and equipment, net

 

Property, plant and equipment, net consisted of the following:

 

 

 

September 30,
2018

 

March 31,
2018

 

Leasehold improvements

 

$

154

 

$

154

 

Office equipment

 

49

 

49

 

Computer equipment

 

91

 

87

 

Plant and laboratory equipment

 

451

 

336

 

 

 

745

 

626

 

Less: Accumulated depreciation and amortization

 

(325

)

(256

)

 

 

$

420

 

$

370

 

 

Depreciation and amortization expense was $36 and $69 for the three and six months ended September 30, 2018, respectively.  Depreciation and amortization expense was $27 and $50 for the three and six months ended September 30, 2017, respectively.

 

6.              Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

 

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities consisted of the following:

 

 

 

September 30,
2018

 

March 31,
2018

 

Accrued research and development costs

 

$

347

 

$

949

 

Accrued compensation and benefits costs

 

671

 

949

 

Accrued professional fees

 

472

 

1,094

 

Deferred rent

 

24

 

26

 

Other

 

158

 

153

 

 

 

$

1,672

 

$

3,171

 

 

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7.              Convertible preferred stock

 

The Company has issued series seed convertible preferred stock (the “series seed preferred stock”), series A convertible preferred stock (the “series A preferred stock”) and series B convertible preferred stock (the “series B preferred stock”). The series seed preferred stock, series A preferred stock and series B preferred stock are collectively referred to as the “preferred stock.”  In connection with the closing of the IPO, the preferred stock converted into 19,157,360 shares of common stock on a 1:9.94688 basis. There was no preferred stock outstanding as of September 30, 2018.

 

As of March 31, 2018, preferred stock consisted of the following (in thousands, except share amounts):

 

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

 

 

Preferred
Shares
Authorized

 

Preferred
Shares
Issued and
Outstanding

 

Carrying
Value

 

Liquidation
Preference

 

Common Stock
Issuable Upon
Conversion

 

Series Seed preferred stock

 

250,000

 

200,000

 

$

1,609

 

$

2,000

 

1,989,376

 

Series A preferred stock

 

864,553

 

864,553

 

30,000

 

30,000

 

8,599,601

 

Series B preferred stock

 

861,415

 

861,415

 

54,752

 

54,950

 

8,568,383

 

 

 

1,975,968

 

1,925,968

 

$

86,361

 

$

86,950

 

19,157,360

 

 

Prior to the closing of the IPO, the holders of the preferred stock had the following rights and preferences:

 

The holders of the Preferred Stock have the following rights and preferences:

 

Voting

 

The holders of the preferred stock were entitled to vote, together with the holders of common stock, on all matters submitted to the stockholders for a vote and were entitled to the number of votes equal to the number of whole shares of common stock into which such holders of preferred stock could convert on the record date of for determination of stockholders entitled to vote. The holders of preferred stock and common stock, voting as a single class, were entitled to elect two directors of the Company. Additionally, the holders of the series seed preferred stock were entitled to elect two directors of the Company, the holders of the series A preferred stock were entitled to elect one director of the Company and the holders of at least 55% of the outstanding series B preferred stock were entitled to elect two directors of the Company.

 

Conversion

 

Each share of preferred stock was convertible into common stock, at any time, at the option of the holder, and without the payment of additional consideration, at the applicable conversion ratio then in effect for each series of preferred stock and subject to adjustment in accordance with anti-dilution provisions. In addition, each share of preferred stock was convertible into common stock at the applicable conversion ratio then in effect for each series of preferred stock upon the earlier of (i) the closing of a firm commitment underwritten public offering of the Company’s common stock with gross proceeds to the Company of at least $30,000 and at a price per share of not less than $9.62, subject to appropriate adjustment in the event of any stock split, stock dividend, combination or other similar recapitalization, or (ii) a date specified by vote or written consent of the holders of 75% of the outstanding preferred stock (voting together as a single class on an as-converted basis). For any events of deemed liquidation (as defined below) in which series B preferred stock investors would receive less than their full liquidation preference, a further approval of holders of 55% of the outstanding series B preferred stock was required. As of March 31, 2018, each share of preferred stock was convertible into 9.94688 share of common stock.

 

The conversion ratio for each series of preferred stock was determined by dividing the original issue price of each series of preferred stock by the conversion price of each series (as defined below). As of March 31, 2018, the series seed preferred stock original issue price and series seed preferred stock conversion price were $1.01 per share and $10.00 per share, respectively. As of March 31, 2018, the series A preferred stock original issue price and

 

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series A preferred stock conversion price were $3.49 per share and $34.70 per share, respectively. As of March 31, 2018, the series B preferred stock original issue price and series B preferred stock conversion price were $6.41 per share and $63.79 per share, respectively. Such series seed preferred stock original issue price, series A preferred stock original issue price and series B preferred stock original issue price and series seed preferred stock conversion price, series A preferred stock conversion price and series B preferred stock conversion price, and the rate at which each series of preferred stock may be converted into common stock, were subject to appropriate adjustment from time to time in the event of any stock dividend, stock split, combination or other similar recapitalization with respect to the preferred stock. The series seed preferred stock conversion price, series A preferred stock conversion price and series B preferred stock conversion price were also subject to adjustments based on weighted-average anti-dilution provisions set forth in the Company’s certificate of incorporation, as amended and restated, in the event that additional securities were issued at a purchase price less than the series seed preferred stock conversion price, series A preferred stock conversion price or series B preferred stock conversion price then in effect.

 

Dividends

 

The holders of the preferred stock were entitled to be paid noncumulative dividends if and when declared by the Company’s board of directors. The Company could not pay any dividends on shares of common stock of the Company unless the holders of preferred stock then outstanding simultaneously receive dividends at the same rate and same time as dividends paid with respect to common stock. Dividends were to accrue on a daily basis assuming a 365-day year, and were to be paid in cash. Through September 30, 2018 and March 31, 2018, no dividends had been declared or paid.

 

Liquidation preference

 

In the event of any voluntary or involuntary liquidation event, dissolution, winding up of the Company or an event of deemed liquidation, each holder of the then outstanding series B preferred stock would have been entitled to receive, prior and in preference to any distributions to the holders of series A preferred stock, series seed preferred stock and common stock, an amount equal to the greater of (i) the applicable original issue price, plus any declared but unpaid dividends thereon, or (ii) the amount such holder would have received if such holder had converted its shares into common stock immediately prior to such liquidation event.

 

After the payment of all preferential amounts to the holders of series B preferred stock, each holder of the then outstanding series A preferred stock would have been entitled to receive, prior and in preference to any distributions to the holders of series seed preferred stock and common stock, an amount equal to the greater of (i) the applicable original issue price, plus any declared but unpaid dividends thereon, or (ii) the amount such holder would have received if such holder had converted its shares into common stock immediately prior to such liquidation event.

 

After the payment of all preferential amounts to the holders of series A preferred stock, each holder of the then outstanding series seed preferred stock would have been entitled to receive, prior and in preference to any distributions to the holders of common stock, an amount equal to the greater of (i) the applicable original issue price, plus any declared but unpaid dividends thereon or (ii) the amount such holder would have received if such holder had converted its shares into common stock immediately prior to such liquidation event.

 

After payments have been made in full to the holders of preferred stock, then, to the extent available, the remaining amounts would have been distributed among the holders of the shares of common stock, the holders of series B preferred stock and the holders of series A preferred stock, pro rata based on the number of shares held by each holder, assuming full conversion of all such preferred stock.

 

The holders of series B preferred stock and series A preferred stock were subject to a participation cap (as defined below) for remaining amounts that would have been distributed, which was $127.58 per share for the series B preferred stock and $69.40 per share for the series A preferred stock.

 

To the extent available, the remaining amounts greater than the total of the participation caps would have been distributed among the holders of the shares of common stock, pro rata based on the number of shares held by each holder.

 

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Unless a majority of the holders of the then outstanding preferred stock, on an as-if-converted basis voting together as a single class, elect otherwise, an event of deemed liquidation shall include a merger or consolidation (other than one in which stockholders of the Company own a majority by voting power of the outstanding shares of the surviving or acquiring corporation), sale, transfer or exclusive license of substantially all of the assets of the Company. The preferred stock was conditionally redeemable upon an event of deemed liquidation, which was defined as any (i) merger, consolidation or acquisition, involving the Company or its Subsidiary Undertaking, in which the Company or its subsidiary undertaking was not the surviving entity, (ii) an asset sale, (iii) a share sale, (iv) an initial public offering, (v) the occurrence of a change of control in respect of the Company, (vi) a winding up (vii) or any other a return of capital to stockholders (other than a conversion, redemption or repurchase of shares made in accordance with the applicable governing documents).

 

Redemption

 

The Company’s certificate of incorporation, as amended and restated, did not provide redemption rights to the holders of preferred stock.

 

The holders of shares of convertible preferred stock had liquidation rights in the event of a deemed liquidation that, in certain situations, were not solely within the control of the Company. Therefore, convertible preferred stock was classified outside of stockholders’ equity (deficit).

 

Upon issuance of each class of preferred stock, the Company assessed the embedded conversion and liquidation features of the securities. The Company determined that each class of preferred stock did not require the Company to separately account for the liquidation features. The Company also concluded that no beneficial conversion feature existed upon the issuance date of the series A preferred stock or series B preferred stock as of March 31, 2018. However, the Company did conclude that a beneficial conversion feature existed upon the issuance date of the series seed preferred stock. As the series seed preferred stock was convertible into common stock, at any time, at the option of the holder, and without the payment of additional consideration, at the applicable conversion ratio then in effect, the Company recognized the accretion of the beneficial conversion feature as a deemed dividend immediately upon the issuance of the series seed preferred stock.

 

8.              Preferred stock warrants

 

In connection with the issuance of the series seed preferred stock, the Company issued to the holders of the series seed preferred stock warrants for the purchase of 50,000 shares of series seed preferred stock, which became fully vested and exercisable in the year of issuance. The warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock were issued at an exercise price of $10.00 per share and expire on the earlier of September 16, 2025 or a qualified change of control event.

 

The issuance date fair value of the warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock was $391 and was recorded as a liability with a corresponding reduction in the carrying value of the series seed preferred stock. As of September 30, 2018 and March 31, 2018, the fair value of the warrant liability was $0 and $1,642, respectively. The Company recognized a loss of $2 and $5,452 within other income (expense), net in the consolidated statements of operations for the three and six months ended September 30, 2018, respectively, related to the change in fair value of the warrant liability. The Company recognized a loss of $578 within other income (expense), net in the consolidated statements of operations for the three and six months ended September 30, 2017 related to the change in fair value of the warrant liability.

 

Upon the closing of the Company’s IPO in July 2018, all outstanding preferred stock was converted into common stock and the series seed preferred stock warrants became exercisable for common stock instead of series seed preferred stock. As a result, the warrant liability was remeasured a final time on the closing date of the IPO and reclassified to stockholders’ equity (deficit).

 

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9.              Stockholders’ Equity

 

Common Stock

 

As of September 30, 2018, the Company’s certificate of incorporation, as amended and restated, authorized the Company to issue up to 150,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.001 per share. As of March 31, 2018, the Company was authorized to issue 27,314,288 shares of par value $0.001 per share common stock (including 26,258 authorized shares of common A stock). In July 2017, the Company issued and sold 26,258 shares of par value $0.001 per share common A stock for nominal cash proceeds. In July 2018, the Company repurchased 26,258 shares of par value $0.001 per share common A stock for nominal cash proceeds.  The voting, dividend and liquidation rights of the holders of the Company’s common stock is subject to and qualified by the rights, powers and preferences of the holders of the preferred stock as set forth above.

 

As of September 30, 2018, the Company had reserved 5,811,671 shares of common stock for the exercise of outstanding stock options, the number of shares remaining available for grant under the Company’s 2017 Equity Compensation Plan, the Company’s 2018 Omnibus Incentive Compensation Plan and the Company’s Employee Stock Purchase Plan (see Note 10) and the exercise of the outstanding warrants to purchase shares of common. As of March 31, 2018, the Company had reserved 22,306,801 shares of common stock for the conversion of outstanding shares of preferred stock (see Note 7), the exercise of outstanding stock options, the number of shares remaining available for grant under the Company’s 2017 Equity Compensation Plan (see Note 10) and the exercise of the outstanding warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock (see Note 8), assuming all warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock became warrants to purchase shares of common stock at the applicable conversion ratio.

 

Voting

 

Each share of common stock, including common A stock, entitles the holder to one vote, together with the holders of preferred stock, on all matters submitted to the stockholders for a vote. The holders of common stock, together with the holders of preferred stock and voting as a single class, are entitled to elect two directors of the Company by vote of a majority of such shares.

 

Dividends

 

Common stockholders are entitled to receive dividends, as may be declared by the Company’s board of directors, if any, subject to the preferential dividend rights of the preferred stock. Through September 30, 2018 no cash dividends have been declared or paid.

 

Each share of common A stock is entitled to receive dividends, as may be declared by the Company’s board of directors, if any, equal to a maximum of 100% of each share’s par value. Upon an event of deemed liquidation, common A stock is entitled to receive dividends equal to a maximum of 300% of each share’s par value.

 

Undesignated Preferred Stock

 

As of September 30, 2018, the Company’s certificate of incorporation, as amended and restated, authorized the Company to issue up to 10,000,000 shares of undesignated preferred stock, par value $0.001 per share.  There were no undesignated preferred shares issued or outstanding as of September 30, 2018.

 

10.       Stock-Based Compensation

 

2015 Enterprise Management Incentive Share Option Plan

 

The 2015 Enterprise Management Incentive Share Option Plan of Replimune UK (the “2015 Plan”) provided for Replimune UK to grant incentive stock options, non-statutory stock options, stock awards, stock units, stock appreciation rights and other stock-based awards. Incentive stock options are granted only to the Company’s

 

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employees, including officers and directors who are also employees. Non-statutory stock options are granted to employees, members of the board of directors, outside advisors and consultants of the Company.

 

2017 Equity Compensation Plan

 

In July 2017, in conjunction with the Reorganization, the 2015 Plan was terminated, and all awards were cancelled with replacement awards issued under the 2017 Equity Compensation Plan (the “2017 Plan”). Subsequent to the Reorganization, no additional grants will be made under the 2015 Plan and any outstanding awards under the 2015 Plan will continue with their original terms. The Company concluded that the cancellation of the 2015 Plan and issuance of replacement awards under the 2017 Plan was a modification with no change in the material rights and preferences and therefore no recorded change in the fair value of each respective award.

 

The Company’s 2017 Plan provides for the Company to grant incentive stock options or non-statutory stock options, stock awards, stock units, stock appreciation rights and other stock-based awards. Incentive stock options may be granted only to the Company’s employees, including officers and directors who are also employees. Restricted stock awards and non-statutory stock options may be granted to employees, officers, members of the board of directors, advisors and consultants of the Company. The maximum number of common shares that may be issued under the 2017 Plan was 2,659,885 as of September 30, 2018, of which 0 remained available for future grants as of September 30, 2018. Shares with respect to which awards have expired, terminated, surrendered or cancelled under the 2017 Plan without having been fully exercised will be available for future awards under the 2017 Plan. In addition, shares of common stock that are tendered to the Company by a participant to exercise an award are added to the number of shares of common stock available for the grant of awards.

 

2018 Omnibus Incentive Compensation Plan

 

On July 9, 2018, the Company’s board of directors adopted, and the Company’s stockholders approved the 2018 Omnibus Incentive Compensation Plan (the “2018 Plan”), which became effective immediately prior to the effectiveness of the registration statement for the Company’s initial public offering. The 2018 Plan provides for the issuance of incentive stock options, non-qualified stock options, stock awards, stock units, stock appreciation rights and other stock-based awards. The number of shares initially reserved for issuance under the 2018 Plan is 3,617,968 shares, which is equal to the sum of (i) 3,486,118 shares of the Company’s common stock, plus (ii) the number of shares of the Company’s common stock reserved for issuance under the 2017 Plan that remain available as of the effective date of the 2018 Plan (not to exceed 131,850 shares of the Company’s common stock). If any options or stock appreciation rights, including outstanding options and stock appreciation rights granted under the 2017 Plan (up to 2,520,247 shares), terminate, expire, or are canceled, forfeited, exchanged, or surrendered without having been exercised, or if any stock awards, stock units or other stock-based awards, including outstanding awards granted under the 2017 Plan, are forfeited, terminated, or otherwise not paid in full in shares of common stock, the shares of the Company’s common stock subject to such grants will be available for purposes of our 2018 Plan.

 

The 2015 Plan, the 2017 Plan and the 2018 Plan was administered by the board of directors or, at the discretion of the board of directors, by a committee of the board of directors. However, the board of directors shall administer and approve all grants made to non-employee directors. The exercise prices, vesting and other restrictions are determined at the discretion of the board of directors, except that the exercise price per share of incentive stock options may not be less than 100% of the fair market value of the common stock on the date of grant (or 110% of fair value in the case of an award granted to employees who hold more than 10% of the total combined voting power of all classes of stock at the time of grant) and the term of stock options may not be greater than five years for an incentive stock option granted to a 10% stockholder and greater than ten years for all other options granted. Stock options awarded under both plans expire ten years after the grant date, unless the board of directors sets a shorter term. Vesting periods for both plans are determined at the discretion of the board of directors. Incentive stock options granted to employees and non-statutory options granted to employees, officers, members of the board of directors, advisors, and consultants of the Company typically vest over four years.

 

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Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

On July 9, 2018, the Company’s board of directors adopted and the Company’s stockholders approved the Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “ESPP”), which became effective immediately prior to the effectiveness of the registration statement for the Company’s initial public offering. The total shares of common stock initially reserved for issuance under the ESPP is limited to 348,612 shares. In addition, as of the first trading day of each fiscal year during the term of the ESPP (excluding any extensions), an additional number of shares of the Company’s common stock equal to 1% of the total number of shares outstanding on the last trading day in the immediately preceding fiscal year or 697,224 shares, whichever is less (or such lesser amount as determined by the Company’s board of directors) will be added to the number of shares authorized under the ESPP. If the total number of shares of common stock to be purchased pursuant to outstanding purchase rights on any particular date exceed the number of shares then available for issuance under the ESPP, then the plan administrator will allocate the available shares pro-rata and refund any excess payroll deductions or other contributions to participants.

 

The following table presents, on a weighted-average basis, the assumptions that the Company used to determine the grant-date fair value of stock options granted to employees and directors:

 

 

 

Three and Six Months Ended
September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

2.83

%

1.95

%

Expected term (in years)

 

6.1

 

6.1

 

Expected volatility

 

61.5

%

75.0

%

Expected dividend yield

 

0

%

0

%

 

The following table presents the assumptions that the Company used to determine the grant-date fair value of stock options granted to a non-employee:

 

 

 

Three and Six
Months Ended
September 30,
2017

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

2.29

%

Expected term (in years)

 

10.0

 

Expected volatility

 

75.0

%

Expected dividend yield

 

0

%

 

Stock option valuation

 

The fair value of stock option grants is estimated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. The Company lacks company-specific historical and implied volatility information. Therefore, it estimated its expected stock volatility based on the historical volatility of a publicly traded set of peer companies. For options with service-based vesting conditions, the expected term of the Company’s stock options has been determined utilizing the “simplified” method for awards that qualify as “plain-vanilla” options. The expected term of stock options granted to non-employees is equal to the contractual term of the option award. The risk-free interest rate is determined by reference to the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant of the award for time periods approximately equal to the expected term of the award. Expected dividend yield is based on the fact that the Company has never paid cash dividends and does not expect to pay any cash dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

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Stock options

 

The following table summarizes the Company’s stock option activity:

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted

 

Weighted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average

 

Average

 

Aggregate

 

 

 

Number of

 

Exercise

 

Contractual

 

Intrinsic

 

 

 

Shares

 

Price

 

Term (Years)

 

Value

 

Outstanding as of March 31, 2018

 

2,520,247

 

$

2.72

 

8.91

 

$

2,808

 

Granted

 

1,172,500

 

15.06

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

(7,149

)

1.75

 

 

 

 

 

Cancelled

 

(17,717

)

2.62

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding as of September 30, 2018

 

3,667,881

 

$

6.66

 

8.86

 

$

34,648

 

Options exercisable as of March 31, 2018

 

592,416

 

$

1.84

 

8.22

 

$

1,184

 

Options exercisable as of September 30, 2018

 

648,475

 

$

2.35

 

8.11

 

$

15,143

 

 

The aggregate intrinsic value of stock options is calculated as the difference between the exercise price of the stock options and the fair value of the Company’s common stock for those stock options that had exercise prices lower than the fair value of the Company’s common stock.

 

The total fair value of options vested during the six months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 was $830 and $118, respectively.

 

As of September 30, 2018, there were no outstanding unvested service-based stock options held by non-employees.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

Stock-based compensation expense was classified in the consolidated statements of operations as follows:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

2018

 

2017

 

Research and development

 

$

390

 

$

81

 

$

515

 

$

102

 

General and administrative

 

352

 

75

 

428

 

99

 

 

 

$

742

 

$

156

 

$

943

 

$

201

 

 

As of September 30, 2018, total unrecognized compensation cost related to the unvested stock-based awards was $12,194, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of 2.71 years.

 

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11.       Net loss per share

 

Net Loss per Share

 

Basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders was calculated as follows:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

2018

 

2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numerator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to common stockholders

 

$

(6,461

)

$

(4,660

)

$

(16,505

)

$

(8,212

)

Denominator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average common shares outstanding, basic and diluted

 

24,574,239

 

4,978,264

 

14,831,266

 

4,975,865

 

Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted

 

$

(0.26

)

$

(0.94

)

$

(1.11

)

$

(1.65

)

 

The Company’s potentially dilutive securities, which include stock options, preferred stock and warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock, have been excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share as the effect would be to reduce the net loss per share. Common A stock has been excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share because the shares have nominal economic participation rights. Therefore, the weighted average number of common shares outstanding used to calculate both basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders is the same. The Company excluded the following potential common shares, presented based on amounts outstanding at each period end, from the computation of diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders for the periods indicated because including them would have had an anti-dilutive effect:

 

 

 

Three and Six Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options to purchase common stock

 

3,667,881

 

2,332,017

 

Convertible preferred stock (as converted to common stock)

 

 

19,157,360

 

Warrants to purchase convertible preferred stock (as converted to common stock)

 

497,344

 

497,344

 

 

 

4,165,225

 

21,986,721

 

 

12.       Significant agreements

 

Agreement with Bristol-Myers Squibb Company

 

In February 2018, the Company entered into an agreement with Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (“BMS”). Pursuant to the agreement, BMS will provide to the Company, at no cost, a compound for use in the Company’s ongoing clinical trial. Under the agreement, the Company will sponsor, fund and conduct the clinical trial in accordance with an agreed-upon protocol. BMS granted the Company a non-exclusive, non-transferrable, royalty-free license (with a right to sublicense) under its intellectual property to its compound in the clinical trial and agreed to manufacture and supply its compound, at its cost and for no charge to the Company, for use in the clinical trial.

 

Unless earlier terminated, the agreement will remain in effect until (i) the completion of the clinical trial, (ii) all related clinical trial data have been delivered to both parties and (iii) the completion of any statistical analyses and bioanalyses contemplated by the clinical trial protocol or any analysis otherwise agreed upon by the parties. The agreement may be terminated by either party (i) in the event of an uncured material breach by the other party, (ii) in the event the other party is insolvent or in bankruptcy proceedings or (iii) for safety reasons. Upon termination, the licenses granted to the Company to use BMS’s compound in the clinical trial will terminate.

 

As of September 30, 2018, the Company had not incurred any costs in connection with this agreement.

 

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Agreement with Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

 

In May 2018, the Company entered into an agreement with Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“Regeneron”). The Company and Regeneron are each independently developing compounds for the treatment of certain tumor types. Pursuant to the agreement, the Company and Regeneron will undertake one or more clinical trials using a combination of the compounds being developed by each entity. Under the agreement, each study will be conducted under terms set out in a separately agreed upon study plan that will identify the name of the sponsor and which party will manage the particular clinical trial, and include the protocol, the budget and a schedule of clinical obligations.  In June 2018, under the terms of the agreement between the Company and Regeneron, the parties agreed to the first study plan. The Company and Regeneron have agreed to the protocol, budget, sample testing and clinical obligations schedule under the study plan. Development and supply costs associated with the study plan will be split equally between the Company and Regeneron.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, each party granted the other party a non-exclusive license under its respective intellectual property and agreed to contribute the necessary resources needed to fulfill its respective obligations, in each case, under the terms of the agreed-upon or to-be agreed upon study plans. Development costs of a particular clinical trial will be split equally between the Company and Regeneron.

 

The agreement may be terminated by either party if (i) there is no active study plan for which a final study report has not been completed, (ii) the parties have not entered into a study plan for an additional clinical trial within a period of time after the delivery of the most recent final study report or (iii) in the event of a material breach.

 

The Company will account for costs incurred as part of the study, including costs to supply compounds for use in the study, as research and development expenses within the consolidated statement of operations.  The Company will recognize any amounts received from Regeneron in connection with this agreement as an offset to research and development expense within the consolidated statement of operations.

 

As of September 30, 2018, the Company had not incurred any costs or received any reimbursements in connection with this agreement.

 

13.       Commitments and contingencies

 

Lease agreements

 

In December 2015, the Company entered into a lease agreement for office space in Woburn, Massachusetts, which expires on March 30, 2021. The Company has the option to extend the lease agreement for successive periods of five years. Monthly lease payments, inclusive of base rent and ancillary charges, total $7. Monthly base rent is subject to increase each year in proportion to the Consumer Price Index.

 

In April 2016, the Company entered into a lease agreement for office and laboratory space in Abingdon, England, which expires on April 3, 2026. The Company has the right to terminate the lease as of April 4, 2021 upon at least nine months’ prior written notice. Monthly lease payments are inclusive of base rent, ancillary charges, non-rent shared tenant occupancy costs and the respective value added tax to be paid. Monthly lease payments include base rent of approximately $23 through December 3, 2016 and $31 thereafter. Monthly base rent is subject to increase after April 2021 in proportion to the Retail Price Index.

 

In June 2018, the Company entered into an agreement to lease approximately 63,000 square feet of office, manufacturing and laboratory space within a previously occupied building with approximately 106,000 square feet of rentable space in Framingham, Massachusetts. Pursuant to the lease agreement, the lease term is estimated to commence in November 2018, subject to the landlord completing certain agreed upon landlord improvements. The rent commencement date is estimated to be eight months after the commencement of the lease term. The initial lease term is ten years from the rent commencement date and includes two optional five year extensions. Annual lease payments during the first year are $2,373 with increases of 3.0% each year.

 

The Company recorded rent expense of $33 and $55 during the three and six months ended September 30, 2018, respectively. The Company recorded rent expense of $21 and $42 during the three and six months ended September 30, 2017, respectively.

 

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The following table summarizes the future minimum lease payments due under the Company’s operating leases as of September 30, 2018:

 

2019 (remaining six months)

 

$

240

 

2020

 

1,469

 

2021

 

2,883

 

 

 

$

4,592

 

 

Manufacturing commitments

 

The Company has entered into an agreement with a contract manufacturing organization to provide clinical trial products. As of September 30, 2018 and March 31, 2018, the Company had committed to minimum payments under these arrangements totaling $3,283 and $2,938 through September 30, 2019 and March 31, 2019, respectively.

 

Indemnification agreements

 

In the ordinary course of business, the Company may provide indemnification of varying scope and terms to vendors, lessors, business partners and other parties with respect to certain matters including, but not limited to, losses arising out of breach of such agreements or from intellectual property infringement claims made by third parties. In addition, the Company has entered into indemnification agreements with members of its board of directors that will require the Company, among other things, to indemnify them against certain liabilities that may arise by reason of their status or service as directors or officers. The maximum potential amount of future payments the Company could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is, in many cases, unlimited. To date, the Company has not incurred any material costs as a result of such indemnifications. The Company is not aware of any claims under indemnification arrangements, and therefore it has not accrued any liabilities related to such obligations in its consolidated financial statements as of September 30, 2018 or March 31, 2018.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

The Company is not a party to any litigation and does not have contingency reserves established for any litigation liabilities.

 

14.       Benefit Plans

 

The Company established a defined-contribution savings plan under Section 401(k) of the Code (the “401(k) Plan”). The 401(k) Plan covers substantially all employees who meet minimum age and service requirements and allows participants to defer a portion of their annual compensation on a pre-tax basis. Matching contributions to the 401(k) Plan may be made at the discretion of the Company’s board of directors. During the three and six months ended September 30, 2018, the Company made contributions totaling $33 and $55, respectively, to the 401(k) Plan. During the three and six months ended September 30, 2017, the Company made contributions totaling $9 and $22, respectively, to the 401(k) Plan.

 

We provide a pension contribution plan for our employees in the United Kingdom, pursuant to which we match our employees’ contributions each year in amounts up to 8% of their annual base salary.

 

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15.       Geographic Information

 

The Company operates in two geographic regions: the United States (Massachusetts) and the United Kingdom (Oxfordshire). Information about the Company’s long-lived assets held in different geographic regions is presented in the tables below:

 

 

 

September 30, 2018

 

March 31, 2018

 

United States

 

$

15

 

$

20

 

United Kingdon

 

405

 

350

 

 

 

$

420

 

$

370

 

 

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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with our unaudited consolidated financial statements and related notes appearing in Part I, Item I of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and with our audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto for the year ended March 31, 2018, included in our prospectus dated July 19, 2018 and filed on July 23, 2018 with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, pursuant to Rule 424(b)(4) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, which we prefer to as our Prospectus.

 

Some of the statements contained in this discussion and analysis or set forth elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including information with respect to our plans and strategy for our business, constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act. We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events. The following information and any forward-looking statements should be considered in light of factors discussed elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, particularly including those risks identified in Part II-Item 1A “Risk Factors” and our other filings with the SEC.

 

Our actual results and timing of certain events may differ materially from the results discussed, projected, anticipated, or indicated in any forward-looking statements. We caution you that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and that our actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate may differ materially from the forward-looking statements contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Statements made herein are as of the date of the filing of this Form 10-Q with the SEC and should not be relied upon as of any subsequent date. Even if our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate are consistent with the forward-looking statements contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, they may not be predictive of results or developments in future periods. We disclaim any obligation, except as specifically required by law and the rules of the SEC, to publicly update or revise any such statements to reflect any change in our expectations or in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statements may be based or that may affect the likelihood that actual results will differ from those set forth in the forward-looking statements.

 

Overview

 

We are a clinical-stage biotechnology company committed to applying our leading expertise in the field of oncolytic immunotherapy to transform the lives of cancer patients. We use our proprietary Immulytic platform to design and develop product candidates that are intended to maximally activate the immune system against solid tumors. We are conducting a Phase 1/2 clinical trial in the United Kingdom and, pending the opening of an IND, in the United States with our lead product candidate, RP1, in approximately 150 patients with a range of solid tumors. In addition, in the first half of 2019, we plan to initiate a randomized, controlled Phase 2 clinical trial of RP1 in combination with cemiplimab, versus cemiplimab alone, in approximately 240 patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, or CSCC, which we are designing to potentially support product registration. We also intend to initiate a clinical trial for our second product candidate, RP2, in the first half of 2019.

 

Oncolytic immunotherapy is an emerging class of cancer treatment that exploits the ability of certain viruses to selectively replicate in and directly kill tumors, as well as induce a potent, patient-specific, anti-tumor immune response. Such oncolytic, or “cancer killing,” viruses have the potential to generate an immune response targeted to an individual patient’s particular set of tumor antigens, including to neo-antigens that are uniquely present in tumors. Our product candidates incorporate multiple mechanisms of action into single product candidates in a practical, “off-the-shelf” format that is intended to maximize the immune response against a patient’s cancer and to offer significant advantages over personalized vaccine approaches. Our management team has worked together for more than ten years and successfully developed the first oncolytic immunotherapy, Imlygic, also known as T-Vec, which was approved by the FDA for the treatment of advanced melanoma in 2015.

 

The foundation of our Immulytic platform consists of a proprietary, engineered strain of herpes simplex virus 1, or HSV-1, that has been “armed” with a fusogenic therapeutic protein intended to substantially increase anti-tumor

 

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activity. Our platform enables us to design multiple product candidates that incorporate various further genes whose expression is intended to augment the inherent properties of HSV-1 to both directly destroy tumor cells and induce an anti-tumor immune response.

 

We believe our lead product candidate, RP1, and our other product candidates will be effective at killing tumors and inducing immunogenic, or immune-stimulating, tumor cell death and that it will be highly synergistic with immune checkpoint blockade therapies.

 

We began operations as Replimune Limited, an English limited company that was incorporated in 2015. On July 5, 2017, Replimune Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation, was incorporated and, on July 10, 2017, the shareholders of Replimune Limited effected a share-for-share exchange pursuant to which they exchanged their outstanding shares in Replimune Limited for shares in Replimune Group, Inc., on a one-for-one basis.

 

In addition, the holders of warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock and stock options to acquire Replimune Limited capital stock canceled their warrants and stock options in Replimune Limited and were issued replacement warrants and stock options to acquire Replimune Group, Inc. capital stock on a one-for-one basis. We refer to these transactions collectively as the reorganization. Upon completion of the reorganization, the historical consolidated financial statements of Replimune Limited became the historical consolidated financial statements of Replimune Group, Inc. because the reorganization was accounted for similar to a reorganization of entities under common control due to the high degree of common ownership of Replimune Limited and Replimune Group, Inc. and lack of economic substance to the transaction. We concluded that the reorganization resulted in no change in the material rights and preferences of each respective class of equity interests and no change in the fair value of each respective class of equity interests before and after the reorganization. On December 8, 2017, Replimune Limited transferred all outstanding shares of its wholly owned subsidiary, Replimune, Inc., to Replimune Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation. Replimune Group, Inc. is the sole shareholder of Replimune Limited, Replimune, Inc. and Replimune Securities Corporation, a Massachusetts corporation that was incorporated in November 2017.

 

Financial overview

 

Since our inception, we have devoted substantially all of our resources to developing our Immulytic platform and our lead product candidate, RP1, building our intellectual property portfolio, conducting research and development of our product candidates, business planning, raising capital and providing general and administrative support for our operations. To date, we have financed our operations primarily with proceeds from the sale of equity securities. We do not have any products approved for sale and have not generated any revenue from product sales.  On July 24, 2018, we completed our initial public offering (IPO) of our common stock and issued and sold 6,700,000 shares of our common stock at a public offering price of $15.00 per share, resulting in net proceeds of approximately $93.5 million after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions but before deducting offering costs.  On July 30, 2018, we issued and sold an additional 707,936 shares of our common stock at the IPO price of $15.00 per share pursuant to the underwriters’ partial exercise of their option to purchase additional shares of common stock, resulting in additional net proceeds of approximately $9.9 million after deducting discounts and commissions and other offering expenses.

 

Since our inception, we have incurred significant operating losses. Our ability to generate product revenue sufficient to achieve profitability will depend on the successful development and eventual commercialization of one or more of our product candidates. Our net losses were $6.5 million and $4.7 million for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively and $16.5 million and $8.2 million for the six months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017, respectively. As of September 30, 2018, we had an accumulated deficit of $45.4 million. These losses have resulted primarily from costs incurred in connection with research and development activities and general and administrative costs associated with our operations. We expect to continue to incur significant expenses and increasing operating losses for at least the next several years.

 

We anticipate that our expenses and capital requirements will increase substantially in connection with our ongoing activities, particularly as we advance the preclinical activities and clinical trials of our product candidates.

 

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In addition, we expect to incur additional costs associated with operating as a public company. We expect that our expenses and capital requirements will increase substantially if and as we:

 

·                  conduct our current and future clinical trials with RP1;

·                  progress the preclinical and clinical development of RP2 and RP3;

·                  establish, equip, and operate our own in-house manufacturing facility;

·                  seek to identify and develop additional product candidates;

·                  seek marketing approvals for any of our product candidates that successfully complete clinical trials, if any;

·                  establish a sales, marketing and distribution infrastructure to commercialize any products for which we may obtain marketing approval;

·                  maintain, expand and protect our intellectual property portfolio;

·                  hire and retain additional clinical, quality control, scientific and finance personnel;

·                  acquire or in-license other drugs and technologies; and

·                  add operational, financial and management information systems and personnel, including personnel to support our research and development programs, any future commercialization efforts and our transition to operating as a public company.

 

We will not generate revenue from product sales unless and until we successfully complete clinical development and obtain regulatory approval for RP1 or our other product candidates. If we obtain regulatory approval for any of our product candidates and do not enter into a commercialization partnership, we expect to incur significant expenses related to developing our internal commercialization capability to support product sales, marketing, and distribution. Further, we expect to incur additional costs associated with operating as a public company.

 

As a result, we will need substantial additional funding to support our continuing operations and pursue our growth strategy. Until such time as we can generate significant revenue from product sales, if ever, we expect to finance our operations through a combination of equity offerings, debt financings, collaborations, strategic alliances, and marketing, distribution, or licensing arrangements. We may be unable to raise additional funds or enter into such other agreements or arrangements when needed on favorable terms, or at all. If we fail to raise capital or enter into such agreements as, and when, needed, we may have to significantly delay, scale back, or discontinue the development and commercialization of one or more of our product candidates.

 

Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with pharmaceutical product development, we are unable to accurately predict the timing or amount of increased expenses or when, or if, we will be able to achieve or maintain profitability. Even if we are able to generate product sales, we may not become profitable. If we fail to become profitable or are unable to sustain profitability on a continuing basis, then we may be unable to continue our operations at planned levels and be forced to reduce or terminate our operations.

 

As of September 30, 2018, we had cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments of $147.9 million. We believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments will enable us to fund our operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements through at least 12 months from the issuance of the consolidated financial statements included in this quarterly report on Form 10-Q.

 

See “—Liquidity and capital resources” and “Risk factors—Risks related to our financial position and need for additional capital.”

 

Components of our results of operations

 

Revenue

 

To date, we have not generated any revenue from product sales as we do not have any approved products and do not expect to generate any revenue from the sale of products in the near future. If our development efforts for RP1 or any other product candidates that we may develop in the future are successful and result in regulatory approval, or if

 

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we enter into collaboration or license agreements with third parties, we may generate revenue in the future from a combination of product sales or payments from those collaboration or license agreements.

 

Operating expenses

 

Our expenses since inception have consisted solely of research and development costs and general and administrative costs.

 

Research and development expenses

 

Research and development expenses consist primarily of costs incurred for our research activities, including our discovery efforts and the development of RP1 and our other product candidates, and include:

 

·                  expenses incurred under agreements with third parties, including clinical research organizations, or CROs, that conduct research, preclinical activities and clinical trials on our behalf as well as contract manufacturing organizations, or CMOs, that manufacture our product candidates for use in our preclinical and clinical trials;

·                  salaries, benefits and other related costs, including stock-based compensation expense, for personnel engaged in research and development functions;

·                  costs of outside consultants, including their fees, stock-based compensation and related travel expenses;

·                  the costs of laboratory supplies and acquiring, developing and manufacturing preclinical study and clinical trial materials;

·                  costs related to compliance with regulatory requirements in connection with the development of RP1 and our other product candidates; and

·                  facility-related expenses, which include direct depreciation costs and allocated expenses for rent and maintenance of facilities and other operating costs.

 

We expense research and development costs as incurred. We recognize external development costs based on an evaluation of the progress to completion of specific tasks using information provided to us by our service providers. Payments for these activities are based on the terms of the individual agreements, which may differ from the pattern of costs incurred, and are reflected in our consolidated financial statements as prepaid or accrued research and development expenses.

 

Our direct external research and development expenses are tracked on a program-by-program basis and consist of costs, such as fees paid to consultants, contractors, CMOs, and CROs in connection with our preclinical and clinical development activities. To date, we have not allocated expenses to our earlier-stage programs for RP2 and RP3. In addition, we do not allocate employee costs, costs associated with our discovery efforts, laboratory supplies, and facilities, including depreciation or other indirect costs, to specific product development programs because these costs are deployed across multiple product development programs and, as such, are not separately classified.

 

The table below summarizes our research and development expenses by product candidate or development program for each of the periods presented:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended September 30,

 

Six Months Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

2018

 

2017

 

 

 

(Amounts in thousands)

 

RP1

 

$

1,900

 

$

1,763

 

$

3,607

 

$

2,848

 

Unallocated research and development expenses

 

3,062

 

1,386

 

5,291

 

2,592

 

Total research and development expenses

 

$

4,962

 

$

3,149

 

$

8,898

 

$

5,440

 

 

Research and development activities are central to our business model. Product candidates in later stages of clinical development generally have higher development costs than those in earlier stages of clinical development, primarily due to the increased size and duration of later-stage clinical trials. We expect that our research and development expenses will continue to increase for the foreseeable future as we initiate additional clinical trials of

 

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RP1, complete preclinical development and pursue initial stages of clinical development of RP2 and RP3 and continue to discover and develop additional product candidates. The successful development and commercialization of our product candidates is highly uncertain. This is due to the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with product development and commercialization, including the following:

 

·                  the scope, rate of progress, expense and results of our ongoing clinical trials of RP1, as well as of any future clinical trials of RP2 and RP3 or other product candidates and other research and development activities that we may conduct;

·                  the number and scope of preclinical and clinical programs we decide to pursue;

·                  our ability to maintain our current research and development programs and to establish new ones;

·                  uncertainties in clinical trial design and patient enrollment rates;

·                  the successful completion of clinical trials with safety, tolerability, and efficacy profiles that are satisfactory to the FDA or any comparable foreign regulatory authority;

·                  the receipt of regulatory approvals from applicable regulatory authorities;

·                  our success in establishing, equipping, and operating a manufacturing facility, or securing manufacturing supply through relationships with third parties;

·                  our ability to obtain and maintain patents, trade secret protection, and regulatory exclusivity, both in the United States and internationally;

·                  our ability to protect our rights in our intellectual property portfolio;

·                  the commercialization of our product candidates, if and when approved;

·                  the acceptance of our product candidates, if approved, by patients, the medical community, and third-party payors;

·                  our ability to successfully develop our product candidates for use in combination with third-party products or product candidates;

·                  negative developments in the field of immuno-oncology;

·                  competition with other products; and

·                  significant and changing government regulation and regulatory guidance.

 

A change in the outcome of any of these variables with respect to the development of a product candidate could mean a significant change in the costs and timing associated with the development of that product candidate. For example, if the FDA or another regulatory authority were to require us to conduct clinical trials beyond those that we anticipate will be required for the completion of clinical development of a product candidate, or if we experience significant trial delays due to patient enrollment or other reasons, we would be required to expend significant additional financial resources and time on the completion of clinical development. We may never succeed in obtaining regulatory approval for any of our product candidates.

 

General and administrative expenses

 

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of salaries and other related costs, including stock-based compensation, for personnel in our executive, finance, corporate and business development and administrative functions. General and administrative expenses also include professional fees for legal, patent, accounting, auditing, tax and consulting services; travel expenses; and facility-related expenses, which include direct depreciation costs and allocated expenses for rent and maintenance of facilities and other operating costs.

 

We expect that our general and administrative expenses will increase in the future as we increase our general and administrative headcount to support our continued research and development and potential commercialization of our product candidates. We also expect to incur increased expenses associated with being a public company, including costs of accounting, audit, legal, regulatory and tax-related services associated with maintaining compliance with exchange listing and SEC requirements; director and officer insurance costs; and investor and public relations costs.

 

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Other income (expense), net

 

Research and development incentives

 

Research and development incentives consists of reimbursements of research and development expenditures. We participate, through our subsidiary in the United Kingdom, in the research and development program provided by the United Kingdom tax relief program, such that a percentage of up to 14.5% of our qualifying research and development expenditures are reimbursed by the United Kingdom government, and such incentives are reflected as other income.

 

Change in fair value of warrant liability

 

In connection with the issuance of the series seed preferred stock, we issued to the series seed preferred stock holders warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock. Prior to the completion of our IPO, we classified the warrants as a liability on our consolidated balance sheets. We remeasured the warrant liability to fair value at each reporting date and recognized changes in the fair value of the warrant liability as a component of other income (expense), net in our consolidated statements of operations.

 

Effective upon the completion of our IPO, the warrants to purchase shares of series seed preferred stock became exercisable for shares of common stock instead of shares of preferred stock, and the warrant liability was reclassified to additional paid-in capital. As a result, effective upon the completion of our IPO, we no longer recognize changes in the fair value of the warrant liability as other income (expense), net in our consolidated statements of operations.

 

Interest income

 

Interest income consists of income earned on our cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments. Our interest income has not been significant due to low investment balances and low interest earned on those balances.

 

Other income (expense), net

 

Other income (expense), net consists primarily of realized and unrealized foreign currency transaction gains and losses.

 

Income taxes

 

Since our inception and through September 30, 2018, we have not recorded any income tax benefits for the net losses we incurred in each jurisdiction in which we operate, as we believe, based upon the weight of available evidence, that it is more likely than not that all of our net operating loss carryforwards will not be realized.

 

On December 22, 2017, the U.S. government enacted comprehensive tax legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, or the Tax Act. The Tax Act includes a number of changes to existing tax law, including, among other things, a permanent reduction in the federal corporate income tax rate from a top marginal rate of 35% to a flat rate of 21%, effective as of January 1, 2018, as well as limitation of the deduction for net operating losses to 80% of annual taxable income and elimination of net operating loss carrybacks, in each case, for losses arising in taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017 (though any such net operating losses may be carried forward indefinitely). Under the Tax Act, our deferred tax assets and liabilities (before valuation allowance) were remeasured at the lower federal tax rate, resulting in an increase to our income tax provision with an equal and offsetting reduction in our valuation allowance. All of our recorded income tax benefits and provisions related to the Tax Act are provisional. As of September 30, 2018, we have not recorded any adjustments to the provisional amounts recorded at March 31, 2018.

 

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Results of operations

 

Comparison of the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017

 

The following table summarizes our results of operations for the three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

Change

 

 

 

(Amounts in thousands)

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

$

4,962

 

$

3,149

 

$

1,813

 

General and administrative

 

2,142

 

1,107

 

1,035

 

Total operating expenses

 

7,104

 

4,256

 

2,848

 

Loss from operations

 

(7,104

)

(4,256

)

(2,848

)

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development incentives

 

(77

)

636

 

(713

)

Interest income

 

664

 

10

 

654

 

Change in fair value of warrant liability

 

(2

)

(578

)

576

 

Other income (expense), net

 

58

 

(472

)

530

 

Total other income (expense), net

 

643

 

(404

)

1,047

 

Net loss

 

$

(6,461

)

$

(4,660

)

$

(1,801

)

 

Research and development expenses

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

Change

 

 

 

(Amounts in thousands)

 

Direct research and development expenses by program:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RP1

 

$

1,900

 

$

1,763

 

$

137

 

Unallocated research and development expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel related (including stock-based compensation)

 

1,678

 

920

 

758

 

Other

 

1,384

 

466

 

918

 

Total research and development expenses

 

$

4,962

 

$

3,149

 

$

1,813

 

 

Research and development expenses for the three months ended September 30, 2018 were $5.0 million, compared to $3.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2017. The increase of $1.8 million was due primarily to an increase of approximately $0.1 million in direct research costs associated with RP1 and an approximately $1.7 million increase in our unallocated research and development costs. The increase in RP1 costs was due primarily to an increase in clinical trial costs in the three months ended September 30, 2018 associated with our ongoing Phase 1/2 clinical trial, which commenced in the United Kingdom in October 2017.

 

The increase in unallocated research and development expenses reflected an increase of $0.8 million in personnel-related costs, including stock-based compensation, and an increase of $0.9 million in other costs. The increase in personnel-related costs was primarily due to the hiring of additional personnel in our research and development functions as we began work on our planned Phase 2 clinical trial of RP1 in patients with CSCC. Personnel-related costs for three months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 included stock-based compensation expense of $.0.4 million and $0.1 million, respectively. Other costs increased primarily due to purchases of supplies used across all of our product candidates.

 

General and administrative expenses

 

General and administrative expenses were $2.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2018, compared to $1.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2017. The increase of $1.0 million primarily reflected increases of $0.6 million in personnel related costs, $0.2 million in professional fees and $0.2 million in facility costs. The increase in personnel related costs was due to the hiring of additional personnel in our general and

 

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administrative functions as we expanded our operations in the United States.  The increase in professional fees was due to costs associated with the preparation, audit and review of our financial statements and readiness to become a public company.  The increase in facility costs was due to additional space we leased in June 2018.

 

Other income (expense), net

 

Other income (expense) was $0.6 million for the three months ended September 30, 2018, compared to $(0.4) million for the three months ended September 30, 2017. The increase of $1.0 million was primarily attributable to a $0.7 million increase in interest income, $0.6 million charge related to the change in the fair value of the warrant liability and $0.5 million gain due to changes in foreign currency rates, partially offset by a $0.7 million in research and development incentives.

 

Comparison of the six months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017

 

The following table summarizes our results of operations for the six months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017:

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

Change

 

 

 

(Amounts in thousands)

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

$

8,898

 

$

5,440

 

$

3,458

 

General and administrative

 

4,085

 

1,992

 

2,093

 

Total operating expenses

 

12,983

 

7,432

 

5,551

 

Loss from operations

 

(12,983

)

(7,432

)

(5,551

)

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development incentives

 

361

 

1,103

 

(742

)

Interest income

 

891

 

40

 

851

 

Change in fair value of warrant liability

 

(5,452

)

(578

)

(4,874

)

Other income (expense), net

 

678

 

(1,345

)

2,023

 

Total other income (expense), net

 

(3,522

)

(780

)

(2,742

)

Net loss

 

$

(16,505

)

$

(8,212

)

$

(8,293

)

 

Research and development expenses

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

Change

 

 

 

(Amounts in thousands)

 

Direct research and development expenses by program:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RP1

 

$

3,607

 

$

2,848

 

$

759

 

Unallocated research and development expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel related (including stock-based compensation)

 

3,080

 

1,625

 

1,455

 

Other

 

2,211

 

967

 

1,244

 

Total research and development expenses

 

$

8,898

 

$

5,440

 

$

3,458

 

 

Research and development expenses for the six months ended September 30, 2018 were $8.9 million, compared to $5.4 million for the six months ended September 30, 2017. The increase of $3.5 million was due primarily to an increase of approximately $0.8 million in direct research costs associated with RP1 and an approximately $2.7 million increase in our unallocated research and development costs. The increase in RP1 costs was due primarily to an increase in clinical trial costs in the six months ended September 30, 2018 associated with our ongoing Phase 1/2 clinical trial, which commenced in the United Kingdom in October 2017.

 

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The increase in unallocated research and development expenses reflected an increase of $1.5 million in personnel-related costs, including stock-based compensation, and an increase of $1.2 million in other costs. The increase in personnel-related costs was primarily due to the hiring of additional personnel in our research and development functions as we began work on our planned Phase 2 clinical trial of RP1 in patients with CSCC. Personnel-related costs for six months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017 included stock-based compensation expense of $0.5 million and $0.1 million, respectively. Other costs increased primarily due to purchases of supplies used across all of our product candidates.

 

General and administrative expenses

 

General and administrative expenses were $4.1 million for the six months ended September 30, 2018, compared to $2.0 million for the six months ended September 30, 2017. The increase of $2.1 million primarily reflected increases of $0.9 million in personnel related costs, $0.9 million in professional fees and $0.2 million in facility costs. The increase in personnel related costs was due to the hiring of additional personnel in our general and administrative functions as we expanded our operations in the United States.  The increase in professional fees was due to costs associated with the preparation, audit and review of our financial statements and readiness to become a public company.  The increase in facility costs was due to additional space we leased in June 2018.

 

Other income (expense), net

 

Other income (expense) was $(3.5) million for the six months ended September 30, 2018, compared to $(0.8) million for the six months ended September 30, 2017. The increase of $2.7 million was primarily attributable to a $4.9 million charge related to the change in the fair value of the warrant liability and $0.7 million in research and development incentives, partially offset by a $2.0 million gain due to changes in foreign currency rates and a $0.9 million increase in interest income.

 

Liquidity and capital resources

 

Since our inception, we have not generated any revenue from product sales and have incurred significant operating losses and negative cash flows from our operations. We have not yet commercialized any of our product candidates, which are in various phases of preclinical and clinical development, and we do not expect to generate revenue from sales of any products for the foreseeable future, if at all.

 

Sources of liquidity

 

To date, we have financed our operations primarily with proceeds from the sale equity securities. Through September 30, 2018, we had received gross proceeds of $190.3 million from our sales of common stock and preferred stock. As of September 30, 2018, we had cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments of $147.9 million.

 

On July 24, 2018, we completed our IPO and issued and sold 6,700,000 shares of our common stock at a public offering price of $15.00 per share, resulting in net proceeds of $93.5 million after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions but before deducting offering costs.  On July 30, 2018, we issued and sold an additional 707,936 shares of our common stock at the IPO price of $15.00 per share pursuant to the underwriters’ partial exercise of their option to purchase additional shares of our common stock, resulting in additional net proceeds of $9.9 million after deducting discounts and commissions and other offering expenses.

 

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Cash flows

 

The following table summarizes our cash flows for each of the periods presented:

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

2017

 

 

 

(Amounts in thousands)

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

$

(13,242

)

$

(9,086

)

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

 

(80,219

)

(134

)

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

101,196

 

54,752

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

 

(928

)

1,492

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

 

$

6,807

 

$

47,024

 

 

Operating activities

 

During the six months ended September 30, 2018, net cash used in operating activities was $13.2 million, primarily resulting from our net loss of $16.5 million, net cash used in changes in our operating assets and liabilities of $2.7 million, partially offset by non-cash charges of $5.9 million. Net cash used in changes in our operating assets and liabilities for the six months ended September 30, 2018 consisted primarily of a $1.4 million decrease in accrued expenses and other current liabilities, a $0.3 million increase in the research and development incentives receivable from the United Kingdom government due to the timing and amount of our qualifying expenditures and a $1.0 million increase in prepaid expenses and other current assets due to CRO deposits related to the ongoing Phase 1/2 clinical trial for RP1, partially offset by a $0.1 million increase in accounts payable.

 

During the six months ended September 30, 2017, net cash used in operating activities was $9.1 million, primarily resulting from our net loss of $8.2 million and net cash used in changes in our operating assets and liabilities of $1.7 million, partially offset by non-cash charges of $0.8 million. Net cash used by changes in our operating assets and liabilities for the six months ended September 30, 2017 consisted primarily of a $1.0 million increase in prepaid expenses and other current assets, a $1.1 million increase in the research and development incentives receivable from the United Kingdom government due to the timing and amount of our qualifying expenditures, a $0.1 million decrease in accrued expenses and other current liabilities, partially offset by a $0.6 million increase in accounts payable.  The increase in prepaid expenses and other current assets was due to value-added tax receivables and CMO deposits for RP1 clinical trial supplies.

 

Investing activities

 

During the six months ended September 30, 2018, net cash used in investing activities was $80.2 million, consisting of $110.8 million in purchases of available for sale securities and $0.1 million in purchases of property, plant and equipment, partially offset by $30.7 million in proceeds from maturities of short-term investments.

 

During the six months ended September 30, 2017, net cash used in investing activities consisted of $0.1 million in purchases of property, plant and equipment.

 

We expect that purchases of property, plant and equipment will increase over the next several years resulting from our intended establishment of our own in-house manufacturing facility.

 

Financing Activities

 

During the six months ended September 30, 2018, net cash provided by financing activities consisted primarily of net cash proceeds of $103.3 million from our issuance of common stock pursuant to our initial public offering and concurrent private placement and 2.2 million of payments of issuance costs.

 

During the six months ended September 30, 2018, net cash provided by financing activities consisted of net cash proceeds of $54.8 million from our issuance of Series B preferred stock.

 

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Funding requirements

 

Our plan of operation is to continue implementing our business strategy, continue research and development of RP1 and our other product candidates and continue to expand our research pipeline and our internal research and development capabilities. We expect our expenses to increase substantially in connection with our ongoing activities, particularly as we advance the preclinical activities and clinical trials of our product candidates. In addition, we expect to incur additional costs associated with operating as a public company. We expect that our expenses will increase substantially if and as we:

 

·                  conduct our current and future clinical trials of RP1;

·                  progress the preclinical and clinical development of RP2 and RP3;

·                  seek to identify and develop additional product candidates;

·                  seek marketing approvals for any of our product candidates that successfully complete clinical trials, if any;

·                  establish a sales, marketing and distribution infrastructure to commercialize any products for which we may obtain marketing approval;

·                  until our planned manufacturing facility is operational, require the manufacture by third parties of larger quantities of our product candidates for clinical development and potentially commercialization;

·                  maintain, expand and protect our intellectual property portfolio;

·                  acquire or in-license other drugs and technologies; and

·                  add operational, financial and management information systems and personnel, including personnel to support our research and development programs, any future commercialization efforts and our transition to operating as a public company.

 

As of September 30, 2018, we had cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments of $147.9 million. We believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments will enable us to fund our operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements through at least 12 months from the issuance of the consolidated financial statements included in this quarterly report on Form 10-Q.

 

Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with the development of RP1 and other product candidates and programs, and because the extent to which we may enter into collaborations with third parties for development of our product candidates is unknown, we are unable to estimate the timing and amounts of increased capital outlays and operating expenses associated with completing the research and development of our product candidates. Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors, including those described in this section and above under “—Operating expenses—Research and development expenses.”

 

In addition, we intend to establish, equip, and operate an in-house manufacturing facility to manufacture RP1 and our other product candidates. We expect that such a facility would require capital expenditures of approximately $28.0 million to commence operations.

 

Developing novel biopharmaceutical products, including conducting preclinical studies and clinical trials, is a time-consuming, expensive and uncertain process that takes years to complete, and we may never generate the necessary data or results required to obtain marketing approval for any product candidates or generate revenue from the sale of any products for which we may obtain marketing approval. In addition, our product candidates, if approved, may not achieve commercial success. Our commercial revenues, if any, will be derived from sales of therapies that we do not expect to be commercially available for many years, if ever. Accordingly, we will need to obtain substantial additional funds to achieve our business objectives.

 

Adequate additional funds may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all. We do not currently have any committed external source of funds. To the extent that we raise additional capital through the sale of our equity or convertible debt securities, our shareholders’ interest may be diluted, and the terms of these securities may include liquidation or other preferences and anti-dilution protections that could adversely affect the rights of our common stockholder. Additional debt or preferred equity financing, if available, may involve agreements that include restrictive covenants that may limit our ability to take specific actions, such as incurring debt adversely impact our ability to conduct our business, and may require the issuance of warrants, which could potentially dilute our shareholders’ interest.

 

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If we raise additional funds through collaborations, strategic alliances or licensing arrangements with third parties, we may have to relinquish valuable rights to our technology, future revenue streams, research programs, or product candidates or grant licenses on terms that may not be favorable to us. If we are unable to raise additional funds through equity or debt financings or collaborations, strategic alliances or licensing arrangements with third parties when needed, we may be required to delay, limit, reduce and/or terminate our product development programs or any future commercialization efforts or grant rights to develop and market product candidates that we would otherwise prefer to develop and market ourselves.

 

Contractual obligations and commitments

 

During the three and six months ended September 30, 2018, there were no material changes to our contractual obligations and commitments from those described under the heading “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Contractual Obligations and Commitments” in our Prospectus.

 

Critical accounting policies and significant judgments and estimates

 

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. The preparation of our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures requires us to make estimates, assumptions and judgments that affect the reported amount of assets, liabilities, revenue, costs and expenses, and related disclosures. We believe that of our critical accounting policies described under the heading “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Estimates” in our Prospectus:

 

·                  accrued research and development expenses and

·                  stock-based compensation

 

Accordingly, we believe the policies set forth above are critical to fully understanding and evaluating our financial condition and results of operations. If actual results or events differ materially from the estimates, judgments and assumptions used by us in applying these policies, our reported financial condition and results of operations could be materially affected. There have been no significant changes to our critical accounting policies from those described in our Prospectus.

 

Off-balance sheet arrangements

 

We did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements during the periods presented, and we do not currently have, any off-balance sheet arrangements, as defined in the rules and regulations of the SEC.

 

Recently issued accounting pronouncements

 

A description of recently issued accounting pronouncements that may potentially impact our financial position and results of operations is disclosed in Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this Quarterly Report.

 

Item 3.         Quantitative and qualitative disclosures about market risks

 

Interest rate sensitivity

 

As of September 30, 2018, we had cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments of $147.9 million, which consisted of cash equivalents, commercial paper and commercial debt securities. Interest income is sensitive to changes in the general level of interest rates; however, due to the nature of these investments, an immediate 10% change in interest rates would not have a material effect on the fair market value of our investment portfolio.

 

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As of September 30, 2018, we had no debt outstanding and are therefore not subject to interest rate risk related to debt.

 

Foreign currency exchange risk

 

Our headquarters are located in the United States, where the majority of our general and administrative expenses are incurred in U.S. dollars. The majority of our research and development costs are incurred by our subsidiary in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom, whose functional currency is the British pound. We are exposed to foreign exchange rate risk. During the three and six months ended September 30, 2018, we recognized foreign currency transaction gains (losses) of $(0.1) million, and $(1.0) million, respectively. During the three and six months ended September 30, 2017, we recognized foreign currency transaction gains (losses) of $0.6 million, and $1.6 million, respectively. These gains (losses) are primarily related to unrealized and realized foreign currency gains and losses as a result of transactions entered into by our United Kingdom subsidiary in currencies other than the British pound, primarily the euro. These foreign currency transaction gains (losses) were recorded as a component of other income (expense), net in our consolidated statements of operations. We believe that a 10% change in the exchange rate between the British pound and the euro would not have a material impact on our financial position or results of operations.

 

As we continue to grow our business, our results of operations and cash flows will be subject to fluctuations due to changes in foreign currency exchange rates, which could adversely impact our results of operations. To date, we have not entered into any foreign currency hedging contracts to mitigate our exposure to foreign currency exchange risk.

 

Emerging growth company status

 

As an “emerging growth company,” the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 permits us to take advantage of an extended transition period to comply with new or revised accounting standards applicable to public companies until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We have irrevocably elected to “opt out” of this provision and, as a result, we will comply with new or revised accounting standards when they are required to be adopted by public companies that are not emerging growth companies.

 

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Item 4.         Controls and Procedures.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

The term “disclosure controls and procedures,” as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act refers to controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that such information is accumulated and communicated to a company’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

In designing and evaluating our disclosure controls and procedures, management recognizes that disclosure controls and procedures, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the disclosure controls and procedures are met. Additionally, in designing disclosure controls and procedures, our management necessarily was required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible disclosure controls and procedures. The design of any system of controls also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

 

Based on the evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of June 30, 2018, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Accounting Officer have concluded that, as of June 30, 2018, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective at the reasonable assurance level as a result of the material weaknesses discussed below. Notwithstanding these material weaknesses, our management has concluded that the financial statements included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report present fairly, in all material respects, our financial position, results of operations and cash flows in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”).

 

During the audit of our consolidated financial statements as of and for the years ended March 31, 2017 and 2018, we identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.  The material weaknesses that we identified were as follows:

 

·                  We did not design or maintain an effective control environment commensurate with our financial reporting requirements. We lacked a sufficient number of professionals with an appropriate level of accounting knowledge, training and experience to appropriately analyze, record and disclose accounting matters timely and accurately. Additionally, the limited personnel resulted in our inability to consistently establish appropriate authorities and responsibilities in pursuit of our financial reporting objectives, as demonstrated by, among other things, our insufficient segregation of duties in our accounting function. This material weakness further contributed to the material weakness below.

 

·                  We did not design and maintain formal accounting policies, processes and controls to analyze, account for and disclose complex transactions, including accounting for preferred stock, stock-based compensation, warrant liabilities and leases.

 

Changes in Internal Controls over Financial Reporting

 

There has been no change in our internal control over financial reporting during the three months ended June 30, 2018 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings.

 

We are not currently a party to any material legal proceedings.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors(1)

 

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below, together with all of the other information in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations and Financial Condition.” If any of the following risks are realized, our business, financial condition, operating results and prospects could be materially and adversely affected. In that event, the price of our common stock could decline, and you could lose part or all of your investment. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently believe to be immaterial may also adversely affect our business.”

 

Risks related to product development

 

Our product candidates are in the early stages of development, are not approved for commercial sale and might never receive regulatory approval or become commercially viable. We have never generated any revenue from product sales and may never be profitable.

 

All of our product candidates are in research or early development. We have not generated any revenues from the sale of products and do not expect to do so for at least the next several years. Our lead product candidate, RP1, and any other product candidates will require extensive preclinical and/or clinical testing and regulatory approval prior to commercial use. Our research and development efforts may not be successful. Even if our clinical development efforts result in positive data, our product candidates may not receive regulatory approval or be successfully introduced and marketed at prices that would permit us to operate profitably.

 

We currently have only one product candidate, RP1, in clinical development. A failure of this product candidate in clinical development would adversely affect our business and may require us to discontinue development of other product candidates based on the same therapeutic approach.

 

RP1 is our only clinical development-stage product candidate. Although we have other product candidates, RP2 and RP3, in preclinical development and we intend to develop additional product candidates in the coming years, it will take additional investment and time for such product candidates to reach the same stage of development as RP1, and there can be no assurance that they will ever do so. Since all of the product candidates in our current pipeline are based on our Immulytic platform, if RP1 fails in development as a result of any underlying problem with our Immulytic platform, then we may be required to discontinue development of all product candidates that are based on our therapeutic approach. If we were required to discontinue development of RP1 or our other product candidates, or if any of them were to fail to receive regulatory approval or achieve sufficient market acceptance, we could be prevented from or significantly delayed in achieving profitability. We can provide no assurance that we would be successful at developing other product candidates based on an alternative therapeutic approach.

 

We will not be able to commercialize our product candidates if our preclinical studies do not produce successful results and/or our clinical trials do not demonstrate the safety and efficacy of our product candidates.

 

Our lead product candidate, RP1, is in the early stages of a Phase 1/2 clinical trial in the United Kingdom and we expect to open the Phase 1/2 clinical trial in the United States in the fourth calendar quarter of 2018, while our other product candidates, RP2 and RP3, are in preclinical development. We expect to file INDs and foreign equivalents for RP2 and RP3 and, subject to regulatory clearance, expect RP2 to begin a Phase 1/2 clinical trial in the first half of 2019 and expect RP3 to enter clinical development in the first half of 2020. Our product candidates will require preclinical and clinical trials before we can submit a marketing application to the applicable regulatory authorities.

 


(1)  NTD: Subject to continued review.

 

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Our product candidates are susceptible to the risks of failure inherent at any stage of product development, including the occurrence of unexpected or unacceptable adverse events or the failure to demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials. Clinical development is expensive and can take many years to complete, and its outcome is inherently uncertain.

 

The results of preclinical studies, preliminary study results, and early clinical trials of our product candidates may not be predictive of the results of later-stage clinical trials. While we are currently conducting an early stage Phase 1/2 clinical trial with RP1, we do not yet have clinical results for any of our product candidates. Our product candidates may not perform as we expect, may ultimately have a different or no impact on tumors, may have a different mechanism of action than we expect in humans, and may not ultimately prove to be safe and effective.

 

Preliminary and final results from preclinical studies and early stage trials, and trials in compounds that we believe are similar to ours, may not be representative of results that are found in larger, controlled, blinded, and longer-term studies. Product candidates may fail at any stage of preclinical or clinical development. Product candidates may fail to show the desired safety and efficacy traits even if they have progressed through preclinical studies or initial clinical trials. Preclinical studies and clinical trials may also reveal unfavorable product candidate characteristics, including safety concerns. A number of companies in the biopharmaceutical industry have suffered significant setbacks in clinical trials, notwithstanding promising results in earlier preclinical studies or clinical trials or promising mechanisms of action. In some instances, there can be significant variability in safety or efficacy results between different clinical trials of the same product candidate due to numerous factors, including changes in trial procedures set forth in protocols, differences in the size and type of the patient populations, changes in and adherence to the clinical trial protocols and the rate of dropout among clinical trial participants. Moreover, should there be an issue with the design of a clinical trial, our results may be impacted. We may not discover such a flaw until the clinical trial is at an advanced stage.

 

We may also experience numerous unforeseen events during, or as a result of, clinical trials that could delay or prevent our ability to receive marketing approval or commercialize our product candidates, including:

 

·                  regulators or institutional review boards, or IRBs, may not authorize us or our investigators to commence a clinical trial, conduct a clinical trial at a prospective trial site, or amend trial protocols, or may require that we modify or amend our clinical trial protocols;

 

·                  we may experience delays in reaching, or fail to reach, agreement on acceptable clinical trial contracts or clinical trial protocols with prospective trial sites and/or CROs;

 

·                  clinical trials of our product candidates may produce negative or inconclusive results, or our studies may fail to reach the necessary level of statistical significance, and we may decide, or regulators may require us, to conduct additional clinical trials or abandon product development programs;

 

·                  the number of patients required for clinical trials of our product candidates may be larger than we anticipate, enrollment in these clinical trials may be slower than we anticipate or participants may drop out of these clinical trials or be lost to follow-up at a higher rate than we anticipate, or may elect to participate in alternative clinical trials sponsored by our competitors with product candidates that treat the same indications as our product candidates;

 

·                  our third-party contractors may fail to comply with regulatory requirements or the clinical trial protocol, or meet their contractual obligations to us in a timely manner, or at all, or we may be required to engage in additional clinical trial site monitoring;

 

·                  we, regulators, or IRBs may require that we or our investigators suspend or terminate clinical research for various reasons, including noncompliance with regulatory requirements or a finding that the participants are being exposed to unacceptable health risks, undesirable side effects, or other unexpected characteristics of the product candidate, or due to findings of undesirable effects caused by a chemically or mechanistically similar therapeutic or therapeutic candidate;

 

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·                  changes could be adopted in marketing approval policies during the development period, rendering our data insufficient to obtain marketing approval;

 

·                  statutes or regulations could be amended or new ones could be adopted;

 

·                  changes could be adopted in the regulatory review process for submitted product applications;

 

·                  the cost of clinical trials of our product candidates may be greater than we anticipate or we may have insufficient funds for a clinical trial or to pay the substantial user fees required by the FDA upon the filing of a Biologics License Application, or BLA, or equivalent authorizations from comparable foreign regulatory authorities;

 

·                  the supply or quality of our product candidates or other materials necessary to conduct clinical trials of our product candidates may be insufficient or inadequate;

 

·                  we may decide, or regulators may require us, to conduct or gather, as applicable, additional clinical trials, analyses, reports, data, or preclinical trials, or we may abandon product development programs;

 

·                  we may fail to reach an agreement with regulators or IRBs regarding the scope, design, or implementation of our clinical trials, and the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities may require changes to our study designs that make further study impractical or not financially prudent;

 

·                  regulators may ultimately disagree with the design or our conduct of our preclinical studies or clinical trials, finding that they do not support product candidate approval;

 

·                  we may have delays in adding new investigators or clinical trial sites, or we may experience a withdrawal of clinical trial sites;

 

·                  patients that enroll in our studies may misrepresent their eligibility or may otherwise not comply with the clinical trial protocol, resulting in the need to drop the patients from the study or clinical trial, increase the needed enrollment size for the clinical trial or extend its duration;

 

·                  there may be regulatory questions or disagreements regarding interpretations of data and results;

 

·                  the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities may disagree with our study design, including endpoints, or our interpretation of data from preclinical studies and clinical trials or find that a product candidate’s benefits do not outweigh its safety risks;

 

·                  the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities may not accept data from studies with clinical trial sites in foreign countries;

 

·                  the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities may disagree with our intended indications;

 

·                  the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities may fail to approve or subsequently find fault with the manufacturing processes or our manufacturing facilities for clinical and future commercial supplies;

 

·                  the data collected from clinical trials of our product candidates may not be sufficient to the satisfaction of the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities to support the submission of a BLA or other comparable submission in foreign jurisdictions or to obtain regulatory approval in the United States or elsewhere;

 

·                  the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities may take longer than we anticipate to make a decision on our product candidates; and

 

·                  we may not be able to demonstrate that a product candidate provides an advantage over current standards of care or current or future competitive therapies in development.

 

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Our development costs will also increase if we experience delays in testing or approvals, and we may not have sufficient funding to complete the testing and approval process for any of our product candidates. We may be required to obtain additional funds to complete clinical trials and prepare for possible commercialization of our product candidates. We do not know whether any preclinical tests or clinical trials beyond what we currently have planned will be required, will begin as planned, will need to be restructured, or will be completed on schedule, or at all. Significant delays relating to any preclinical or clinical trials also could shorten any periods during which we may have the exclusive right to commercialize our product candidates or allow our competitors to bring products to market before we do and impair our ability to successfully commercialize our product candidates and may harm our business and results of operations. In addition, many of the factors that cause, or lead to, delays in clinical trials may ultimately lead to the denial of marketing approval of any of our product candidates. If any of these occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations, stock price and prospects may be materially harmed.

 

We anticipate that our product candidates will be used in combination with third-party drugs, some of which are still in development, and we have limited or no control over the supply, regulatory status, or regulatory approval of such drugs.

 

Our product candidates are intended to be administered in combination with checkpoint blockade drugs, a class of drugs that are intended to stop tumor cells from “switching off” an immune system attack against themselves. We have entered into an agreement with Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, or BMS, for the supply of nivolumab, its anti-PD-1 therapy, for use in connection with our current Phase 1/2 clinical trial with RP1. We have also entered into a clinical collaboration agreement with Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., or Regeneron, which includes the supply of cemiplimab, its anti-PD-1 therapy, for clinical trials conducted under the agreement. The first planned clinical trial to be conducted under the agreement is a randomized, controlled Phase 2 clinical trial of RP1 in combination with cemiplimab, compared to cemiplimab alone, in approximately 240 patients with CSCC. We may enter into additional agreements for the supply of anti-PD-1 products for use in connection with the development of one or more of our product candidates. Our ability to develop and ultimately commercialize our product candidates used in combination with nivolumab, cemiplimab or any other checkpoint blockade therapy will depend on our ability to access such drugs on commercially reasonable terms for the clinical trials and their availability for use with the commercialized product, if approved. We cannot be certain that current or potential future commercial relationships will provide us with a steady supply of such drugs on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

 

Any failure to maintain or enter into new successful commercial relationships, or the expense of purchasing checkpoint blockade therapies in the market, may delay our development timelines, increase our costs and jeopardize our ability to develop our product candidates as commercially viable therapies. If any of these occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations, stock price and prospects may be materially harmed.

 

Moreover, the development of product candidates for use in combination with another product or product candidate may present challenges that are not faced for single agent product candidates. We are developing RP1 and our other product candidates for use in combination with anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 therapies and may develop RP1 or our other product candidates for use with other therapies. The FDA may require us to use more complex clinical trial designs in order to evaluate the contribution of each product and product candidate to any observed effects. It is possible that the results of these trials could show that any positive previous trial results are attributable to the combination therapy and not our product candidates. Moreover, following product approval, the FDA may require that products used in conjunction with each other be cross labeled for combined use. To the extent that we do not have rights to the other product, this may require us to work with a third party to satisfy such a requirement. Moreover, developments related to the other product may impact our clinical trials for the combination as well as our commercial prospects should we receive marketing approval. Such developments may include changes to the other product’s safety or efficacy profile, changes to the availability of the approved product, and changes to the standard of care.

 

In the event that BMS, Regeneron or any future collaborator or supplier cannot continue to supply their products on commercially reasonable terms, we would need to identify alternatives for accessing an anti-PD-1 therapy. Additionally, should the supply of products from BMS, Regeneron or any future collaborator or supplier be interrupted, delayed or otherwise be unavailable to us, our clinical trials may be delayed. In the event we are unable

 

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to source a supply of an alternative anti-PD-1 therapy, or are unable to do so on commercially reasonable terms, our business, financial condition, results of operations, stock price and prospects may be materially harmed.

 

If we fail to develop additional product candidates, our commercial opportunity could be limited.

 

Our lead product candidate is RP1. A key part of our strategy is to pursue clinical development of RP1 and additional product candidates, including RP2 and RP3. Developing, obtaining marketing approval for, and commercializing additional product candidates will require substantial additional funding beyond the net proceeds that we raised in connection with our IPO and will be subject to the risks of failure inherent in medical product development. We cannot assure our shareholders that we will be able to successfully advance any of these additional product candidates through the development process.

 

Even if we obtain approval from the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities to market additional product candidates for the treatment of solid tumors, we cannot assure our shareholders that any such product candidates will be successfully commercialized, widely accepted in the marketplace, or more effective than other commercially available alternatives. If we are unable to successfully develop and commercialize additional product candidates our commercial opportunity may be limited and our business, financial condition, results of operations, stock price and prospects may be materially harmed.

 

Risks related to regulatory approval

 

Even if our development efforts are successful, we may not obtain regulatory approval for any of our product candidates in the United States or other jurisdictions, which would prevent us from commercializing our product candidates. Even if we obtain regulatory approval for our product candidates, any such approval may be subject to limitations, including with respect to the approved indications or patient populations, which could impair our ability to successfully commercialize our product candidates.

 

We are not permitted to market or promote or sell any of our product candidates before we receive regulatory approval from the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities, and we may never receive such regulatory approval for any of our product candidates. Securing marketing approval requires the submission of extensive preclinical and clinical data and supporting information to regulatory authorities for each therapeutic indication to establish the product candidate’s safety and efficacy for that indication. Securing marketing approval also requires the submission of information about the product manufacturing process to, and inspection of manufacturing facilities and clinical trial sites by, the regulatory authorities. If we do not receive approval from the FDA and comparable foreign regulatory authorities for any of our product candidates, we will not be able to commercialize such product candidates in the United States or in other jurisdictions. If significant delays in obtaining approval for and commercializing our product candidates occur in any jurisdictions, our business, financial condition, results of operations, stock price and prospects will be materially harmed. Even if our product candidates are approved, they may:

 

·                  be subject to limitations on the indicated uses or patient populations for which they may be marketed, distribution restrictions, or other conditions of approval;

 

·                  contain significant safety warnings, including boxed warnings, contraindications, and precautions;

 

·                  not be approved with label statements necessary or desirable for successful commercialization; or

 

·                  contain requirements for costly post-market testing and surveillance, or other requirements, including the submission of a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy, or REMS, to monitor the safety or efficacy of the products.

 

We have not previously submitted a BLA to the FDA, or a similar marketing application to comparable foreign regulatory authorities, for any product candidate, and we can provide no assurance that will ultimately be successful in obtaining regulatory approval for claims that are necessary or desirable for successful marketing, or at all.

 

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The regulatory approval processes of the FDA and comparable foreign regulatory authorities are lengthy, time consuming and inherently unpredictable. If we are not able to obtain, or experience delays in obtaining, required regulatory approvals, we will not be able to commercialize our product candidates as expected, and our ability to generate revenue may be materially impaired.

 

The time required to obtain approval by the FDA and comparable foreign regulatory authorities is unpredictable but typically takes many years following the commencement of clinical trials and depends upon numerous factors, including the substantial discretion of the regulatory authorities. In addition, approval policies, regulations, or the type and amount of clinical data necessary to gain approval may change during the course of a product candidate’s clinical development and may vary among jurisdictions. For example, the FDA verbally informed us on March 23, 2018 and confirmed in writing on April 18, 2018 that our Phase 1/2 clinical trial of RP1 was on clinical hold and could not commence at U.S. sites until we submitted the results of a preclinical toxicology and biodistribution study with a longer follow-up period than was required by the regulatory authorities in the United Kingdom and the FDA cleared us to proceed with the clinical trial. We submitted the results from this study to the FDA in August of 2018. On September 6, 2018 the FDA accepted the Company’s IND application. These regulatory requirements may require us to amend our clinical trial protocols, conduct additional preclinical studies or clinical trials that may require regulatory or IRB approval, or otherwise cause delays in the approval or rejection of an application. Any delay in obtaining or failure to obtain required approvals could materially adversely affect our ability to generate revenue from the particular product candidate, which may materially harm our business, financial condition, results of operations, stock price and prospects.

 

Regulatory authorities have substantial discretion in the approval process and may refuse to accept any application or may decide that our data are insufficient for approval and require additional preclinical, clinical or other studies. In addition, varying interpretations of the data obtained from preclinical and clinical testing could delay, limit or prevent marketing approval of a product candidate. The number and types of preclinical studies and clinical trials that will be required for regulatory approval also varies depending on the product candidate, the disease or condition that the product candidate is designed to address, and the regulations applicable to any particular product candidate. Approval policies, regulations or the type and amount of clinical data necessary to gain approval may change during the course of a product candidate’s clinical development and may vary among jurisdictions, and there may be varying interpretations of data obtained from preclinical studies or clinical trials, any of which may cause delays or limitations in the approval or a decision not to approve an application. It is possible that our product candidates will never obtain the appropriate regulatory approvals necessary for us to commence product sales.

 

If we experience delays in obtaining approval, if we fail to obtain approval of a product candidate or if the label for a product candidate does not include the labeling claims necessary or desirable for the successful commercialization of that product candidate, the commercial prospects for such product candidate may be harmed and our ability to generate revenues from that product candidate may be materially impaired.

 

The FDA or a comparable foreign regulatory authority may determine that our product candidates have undesirable side effects that could delay or prevent their regulatory approval or commercialization.

 

To date, the most commonly reported adverse events observed for RP1 are local erythematous and inflammatory reactions and systemic fevers and chills. However, there can be no assurance that additional undesirable side effects or serious adverse events will not be caused by or associated with RP1 or our other product candidates as they continue through or enter clinical development. Serious adverse events or undesirable side effects caused by our product candidates could cause us, IRBs, and other reviewing entities or regulatory authorities to interrupt, delay, or halt clinical trials and could result in a more restrictive label or the delay or denial of regulatory approval by the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities. For example, if concerns are raised regarding the safety of a new therapeutic as a result of undesirable side effects identified during clinical or preclinical testing, the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authority may order us to cease further development, decline to approve product candidate or issue a letter requesting additional data or information prior to making a final decision regarding whether or not to approve the product candidate. The FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities, or IRBs and other reviewing entities, may also require, or we may voluntarily develop, strategies for managing adverse events during clinical development, which could include restrictions on our enrollment criteria, the use of stopping criteria, adjustments to a study’s design, or the monitoring of safety data by a data monitoring committee, among other

 

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strategies. The FDA or a comparable foreign regulatory authority requests for additional data or information could also result in substantial delays in the approval of our product candidates.

 

Undesirable side effects caused by any of our product candidates could also result in denial of regulatory approval by the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities for any or all targeted indications or the inclusion of unfavorable information in our product labeling, such as limitations on the indicated uses for which the products may be marketed or distributed, a label with significant safety warnings, including boxed warnings, contraindications, and precautions, a label without statements necessary or desirable for successful commercialization, or may result in requirements for costly post-marketing testing and surveillance, or other requirements, including REMS, to monitor the safety or efficacy of the products, and in turn prevent us from commercializing and generating revenues from the sale of our product candidates. Undesirable side effects may limit the potential market for any approved products or could result in the discontinuation of the sales and marketing of the product, or withdrawal of product approvals. Later discovered undesirable side effects may further result in the imposition of a REMS, label revisions, post-approval study requirements, or other testing and surveillance.

 

If any of our product candidates is associated with serious adverse events or undesirable side effects or have properties that are unexpected, we may need to abandon development or limit development of that product candidate to certain uses or subpopulations in which the undesirable side effects or other characteristics are less prevalent, less severe or more acceptable from a risk-benefit perspective. The therapeutic-related side effects could affect patient recruitment or the ability of enrolled patients to complete the trial or result in potential product liability claims. Any of these occurrences may materially harm our business, financial condition, results of operations, stock price and prospects.

 

Changes in product candidate manufacturing or formulation may result in additional costs or delay.

 

As product candidates are developed through preclinical studies to later-stage clinical trials towards approval and commercialization, it is common that various aspects of the development program, such as manufacturing methods and formulation, are altered along the way in an effort to optimize processes and results. Any of these changes could cause our product candidates to perform differently and affect the results of planned clinical trials or other future clinical trials conducted with the altered materials. Such changes may also require additional testing, or notification to, or approval by the FDA or a comparable foreign regulatory authority. This could delay completion of clinical trials, require the conduct of bridging clinical trials or studies, require the repetition of one or more clinical trials, increase clinical trial costs, delay approval of our product candidates and/or jeopardize our ability to commence product sales and generate revenue.

 

Regulatory approval by the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities is limited to those specific indications and conditions for which approval has been granted, and we may be subject to substantial fines, criminal penalties, injunctions, or other enforcement actions if we are determined to be promoting the use of our products for unapproved or “off-label” uses, resulting in damage to our reputation and business.

 

We must comply with requirements concerning advertising and promotion for any product candidates for which we obtain marketing approval. Promotional communications with respect to therapeutics are subject to a variety of legal and regulatory restrictions and continuing review by the FDA, Department of Justice, Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Inspector General, state attorneys general, members of Congress, and the public. When the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities issue regulatory approval for a product candidate, the regulatory approval is limited to those specific uses and indications for which a product is approved. If we are not able to obtain FDA approval for desired uses or indications for our product candidates, we may not market or promote them for those indications and uses, referred to as off-label uses, and our business, financial condition, results of operations, stock price and prospects will be materially harmed. We also must sufficiently substantiate any claims that we make for our products, including claims comparing our products to other companies’ products, and must abide by the FDA’s strict requirements regarding the content of promotion and advertising.

 

While physicians may choose to prescribe products for uses that are not described in the product’s labeling and for uses that differ from those tested in clinical trials and approved by the regulatory authorities we are prohibited from marketing and promoting the products for indications and uses that are not specifically approved by the FDA. These off-label uses are common across medical specialties and may constitute an appropriate treatment for some patients

 

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